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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Northern District of Illinois

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Uncle and Nephew and Two Brothers-In-Law Among Six Defendants Charged in Federal Drug and Gun Probe in West Suburbs of Chicago

CHICAGO — Six defendants, including two brothers-in-law and a man and his nephew, are facing criminal charges as part of a federal investigation into drug and gun trafficking in Chicago’s western suburbs.

The investigation centered on drug sales in Maywood, Bellwood and Hillside, and resulted in the seizure of approximately 700 grams of heroin, some of which tested positive for fentanyl, and more than $15,000 in narcotics proceeds.  Authorities also seized four military-style assault rifles, three handguns and several hundred rounds of ammunition that one of the defendants allegedly sold to an individual who was cooperating with law enforcement.

The probe was conducted under the umbrella of the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force, a partnership between federal, state and local law enforcement agencies.  The principal mission of OCDETF is to identify, disrupt and dismantle the most serious drug and weapons trafficking organizations.

Criminal complaints and affidavits filed in federal court in Chicago charge four defendants with conspiracy to possess a controlled substance with intent to deliver; one defendant with distribution of a controlled substance; and one defendant with illegal possession of a firearm by a felon.  Several of the defendants were arrested Tuesday.  Detention hearings will be held on Thursday and Friday before U.S. Magistrate Judge Sidney I. Schenkier.

The charges were announced by John R. Lausch, Jr., United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois; and Jeffrey S. Sallet, Special Agent-in-Charge of the Chicago office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.  Substantial assistance was provided by the Cook County Sheriff’s Police Department, Maywood Police Department, Chicago Police Department, Illinois State Police, and Johnsburg Police Department.

According to the charges, WINDELL REEDY, 43, of Hillside, operated a drug trafficking organization in the western suburbs.  A source cooperating with law enforcement purchased various quantities of heroin from Windell Reedy on multiple occasions, the complaint states.

Windell Reedy allegedly worked with his uncle, DANNY REEDY, 56, of Bloomingdale, to purchase and obtain wholesale quantities of heroin in the Chicago area and transport it to Memphis, Tenn.  RONALD SCALES, 53, of Hillside, and his brother-in-law, HOWARD BAKER, 58, of Hillside, worked with the Reedys to distribute the heroin, including to the individual in Tennessee, the charges allege.  The complaint accuses DARYL KIMBROUGH, 48, of Bellwood, of performing quality tests on the heroin obtained by the Reedys, and distributing the drug.

The defendant charged with illegal gun possession is KENNETH LOGAN, 38, of Maywood.  Logan sold the rifles and handguns to the cooperating source on four occasions in November and December of last year, the complaint states.  The transactions allegedly occurred in Maywood.  Logan is a convicted felon who was not legally allowed to possess a firearm.

The public is reminded that a complaint contains only charges and is not evidence of guilt.  The defendants are presumed innocent and are entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

The conspiracy charge against Danny Reedy, Scales, Baker and Kimbrough carries a mandatory minimum sentence of ten years in prison and maximum of life, while the distribution charge against Windell Reedy is punishable by up to 20 years and the firearm charge against Logan by up to ten years.  If convicted, the Court must impose reasonable sentences under federal sentencing statutes and the advisory United States Sentencing Guidelines.

Assistant U.S. Attorneys James P. Durkin and Philip Fluhr, Jr., are representing the government.

Topic(s): 
Drug Trafficking
Firearms Offenses
Violent Crime
Updated March 21, 2018