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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
District of Virgin Islands

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, May 1, 2015

Two V.I. National Guard Soldiers Arrested On Charges Of Wire Fraud, Theft, And Making False Statements

St. Croix, USVI – Two Virgin Islands National Guard (VING) soldiers have been arrested after a federal grand jury returned indictments charging them with wire fraud, theft of government money, and making false statements to the government, United States Attorney Ronald W. Sharpe announced today.

Staff Sergeant Emmrie Edwards, 37, who was arrested Thursday, is charged in a 49-count indictment with 47 counts of wire fraud, one count of theft of government money, and one count of making a false statement to the government. After his advice of rights hearing Thursday before U.S. Magistrate Judge George W. Cannon, Edwards was released on an unsecured $50,000 bond. His arraignment is scheduled for May 4, 2015.

Lieutenant Colonel Kenneth Alleyne, 45, who was also arrested Thursday, is charged in a 46-count indictment with 44 counts of wire fraud, one count of theft of government money, and one count of making a false statement to the government. After his advice of rights hearing today before U.S. Magistrate Judge George W. Cannon, Alleyne was released on an unsecured $50,000 bond. His arraignment is scheduled for May 6, 2015.

The indictments are the result of months of investigative work by the U.S. Army Criminal Investigations Command Major Procurement Fraud Unit, Homeland Security Investigations, and the Defense Criminal Investigative Service. The charges for both soldiers relate to improper use of government issued housing allowance funds.

Wire fraud carries a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The theft of government money charge carries a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The making a false statement to the government charge carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

United States Attorney Sharpe reminds the public that an indictment is merely a formal charging document and is not evidence of guilt. Every defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Christian Stringer.

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Updated June 22, 2015