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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Western District of Oklahoma

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Oklahoma City Man Sentenced to 172 Months for Involvement in Heroin and Methamphetamine Conspiracies

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma – VICTOR QUIROS, a/k/a Jay Lozano, 26, a resident of Oklahoma City, has been sentenced to a prison term of 172 months, announced Robert J. Troester, Acting United States Attorney for the Western District of Oklahoma.

Quiros has been in federal custody since August 24, 2017, on federal drug charges.  While executing a search warrant at his residence, law enforcement located heroin, currency, drug paraphernalia, and a Bushmaster Carbon 15 semi-automatic rifle with light, laser, and scope.

On August 23, 2017, Quiros pleaded guilty to a Superseding Information charging that on June 6, 2016, he distributed five or more grams of methamphetamine, also known as "ice."  On August 24, he also pleaded guilty to Count 1 of an Indictment that charged him with conspiring to possess with intent to distribute 100 or more grams of a substance containing heroin from October 2016 to June 2017.

On February 1, 2018, Chief U.S. District Judge Joe Heaton sentenced Quiros to 172 months in prison, to be followed by four years of supervised release.  The court also ordered Quiros to forfeit his semi-automatic rifle and $6,111 in currency.

Evidence at sentencing revealed that Quiros had two runners who delivered heroin on his behalf, as well as several heroin customers who purchased heroin for personal use and further distribution.  The Court found that Quiros was a leader of a criminal activity that involved five or more participants.  The evidence also showed that Quiros maintained a premises for the purpose of manufacturing or distributing heroin. 

This case is the result of an investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Oklahoma City Police Department.  Assistant U.S. Attorneys Nicholas J. Patterson, Virginia L. Hines, and Kerry Blackburn prosecuted the case.

Drug Trafficking
Updated February 7, 2018