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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Western District of Tennessee

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, April 24, 2015

Cordova Man Receives 57 Months for Filing False Tax Returns

 

Memphis, TN – A 26-year-old Cordova man was sentenced to 57 months in federal prison yesterday for filing false income tax returns that garnered over $161,000 in refunds.

Between August 2011 and April 2013, Jeremy Tate obtained the names, birth dates, and Social Security numbers of numerous individuals without their knowledge or consent, and then used the information to file over 120 false tax returns. This resulted in Tate claiming over $161,000 in refunds.

According to the indictment and facts discussed in court, Tate recruited others to open bank accounts and directed the false tax return refunds to be electronically deposited into those accounts.

"Tate’s actions were an affront to the tens of millions of honest citizens who play by the rules and file their taxes in a timely and accurate manner," said U.S. Attorney Edward Stanton III. "Anyone who participates in such a scheme should understand there is a price to be paid and that we and our law enforcement partners will collect in full."

In addition to serving 57 months in prison, Tate will be required to pay $161,021.48 in restitution.

"Investigating refund fraud and identity theft is a priority for IRS-Criminal Investigation," said Christopher A. Henry, Special Agent in Charge for the IRS-Criminal Investigative Division. "Stealing identities and filing false tax returns is a serious crime that hurts innocent taxpayers. Today’s sentencing should serve as a strong warning to those who are considering similar conduct. Law enforcement is serious about

investigating these crimes and holding those who would defraud the government accountable."

The sentencing was conducted by U.S. District Judge S. Thomas Anderson. The case was investigated by the United States Secret Service and IRS-Criminal Investigative Division. Assistant United States Attorney Stephen Hall prosecuted the case on behalf of the government.

Updated April 27, 2015