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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Eastern District of Missouri

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, October 10, 2019

Four Health Care Professionals Indicted for Stealing Controlled Substance Medications for Their Own Personal Use

St. Louis, Missouri –Four licensed health care professionals were indicted today by a federal grand jury for receipt of controlled substance medications by deceit, fraud and misrepresentation.  They stole Schedule II controlled substances from the locked medication cabinets where they worked and falsified patient and/or pharmacy records to conceal the theft.  The following individuals were indicted:

Alyssa Wedepohl, 29, of Hillsboro, Missouri, was a registered nurse at Mercy Hospital South. Between October 2018 and May 2019, Wedepohl stole Hydrocodone, Hydromorphone, Oxycodone, Morphine, Dronabinol, Lorazepam, and Tramadol. 

Jessica Powell, 32, of St. Louis County, Missouri, an employee of Davita Hospital Services, was a registered nurse in the dialysis unit at DePaul Hospital in Bridgeton and SSM Health Lake St. Louis Hospital.  Between February 13, 2017 and February 14, 2018, Powell stole Hydromorphone and Oxycodone-Acetaminophen.

Jacob Gottreu, 26, of St. Charles, Missouri, was a licensed paramedic and worked in the ER of SSM Health DePaul Hospital.  Between May 1, 2019 and June 12, 2019, Gottreu stole Fentanyl.

Rebekkah Johnson, 27, of St. Louis, Missouri, was a pharmacist and worked the night shift at the CVS in Clayton. During 2019, Johnson stole Methylphyphenidate ER, Vyvanse, and Dextroamphetamine-amphetamine ER.

If convicted, each face a maximum penalty of four years in prison and a $250,000 fine.  In determining the actual sentences, a judge is required to consider the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines, which provide recommended sentencing ranges.

The Drug Enforcement Administration is investigating these cases. Assistant United States Attorney Dorothy McMurtry is handling this case.

Charges set forth in the Indictment are merely accusations and do not constitute proof of guilt.  Every defendant is presumed to be innocent unless and until proven guilty. 

Topic(s): 
Health Care Fraud
Updated October 10, 2019