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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
District of Kansas

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, November 21, 2014

Indictment: Keebler Employees Filed False Reports To Receive Unemployment Benefits

 

KANSAS CITY, KAN. – Federal indictments were returned Thursday charging that eight people who worked for Keebler Company in Kansas City, Kan., fraudulently received unemployment benefits, U.S. Attorney Barry Grissom.

In September, similar indictments were filed against 16 people who worked for Keebler.

The new indictments allege that while working for Keebler each of the defendants received unemployment benefits by submitting false reports to the Kansas Department of Labor.

Defendants, who are charged in separate indictments with one count each of theft of government funds and one count of bank fraud, include the following:

Anthony Quiroga, Jr., 48, Shawnee, Kan., who is alleged to have fraudulently received $13,105.
Brian Parker, 51, Grandview, Mo., who is alleged to have fraudulently received $19,966.
Darren Coby, 52, Kansas City, Kan., who is alleged to have fraudulently received $10,824.
Darren Lewis, 46, Kansas City, Mo., who is alleged to have fraudulently received $11,100.
Jerry Jenkins, 51, Linwood, Kan., who is alleged to have fraudulently received $10,738.
Keith Holmes, 43, Kansas City, Mo., who is alleged to have fraudulently received $17,325.
Tammye Hill, 46, Kansas City, Mo., who is alleged to have fraudulently received $10,439.
Terry Richardson, 39, Kansas City, Mo., who is alleged to have received $10,682.

If convicted, they face a maximum penalty of 10 years in federal prison and a fine up to $250,000 on the theft of government funds, and a maximum penalty of 30 years and a fine up to $1 million on the bank fraud charge. The Kansas Department of Labor and the U.S. Department of Labor - Office of Inspector General investigated. Assistant U.S. Attorney Chris Oakley is prosecuting.

OTHER INDICTMENTS

Enrique Torres-Sanchez, 36, who is not a citizen of the United States, is charged with unlawfully re-entering the United States after being convicted of an aggravated felony and deported. He was found Oct. 30, 2014, in Wyandotte County, Kan.

If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of 20 years in federal prison and a fine up to $250,000. Immigration and Customs Enforcement investigated. Assistant U.S. Attorney Trent Krug is prosecuting.

Sajjad S. Chaudhry, 46; Saima Sajjad, 38; and Brian D. Parker, 47, are charged in a superseding indictment with conspiracy to commit food stamp fraud, food stamp fraud counts and wire fraud counts. Chaudhry also is charged with aggravated identity theft counts. The crimes are alleged to have occurred from May 2011 to March 2014 at the KC Gas Mart, 2859 State Avenue, Kansas City, Kan. Chaudhry and his wife, Saima Sajjad, operated and managed the store.

The indictment alleges the defendants took part in fraudulent transactions in which employees of the store gave food stamp recipients cash instead of authorized food items at a rate of about 50 cents on the dollar.

Upon conviction, the crimes carry the following penalties:
Conspiracy: A maximum penalty of five years and a fine up to $250,000.
Food stamp fraud: A maximum penalty of five years and a fine up to $250,000.
Wire fraud: A maximum penalty of 20 years and a fine up to $250,000.
Aggravated identity theft: A mandatory two years consecutive to other imprisonment and a fine up to $250,000.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture - Office of Inspector General investigated. Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Erin Tomasic is prosecuting.

Dan Kelly, 45, Wichita, Kan., is charged with two counts of possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine. The crimes are alleged to have occurred in September and November 2014 in Sedgwick County, Kan.

If convicted, he faces a penalty of not less than 10 years and a fine up to $4 million on one count, and a penalty of not less than 5 years and a fine up to $2 million on the other count. The Drug Enforcement Administration investigated. Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Michelle Jacobs is prosecuting.

Christopher S. Kemp, 31, is charged with escaping from a federal halfway house in Leavenworth, Kan., on Nov. 14, 2014.

If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of 5 years and a fine up to $250,000. The U.S. Marshals Service investigated. Assistant U.S. Attorney Chris Oakley is prosecuting.

In all cases, defendants are presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty. The indictments merely contain allegations of criminal conduct.

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Updated December 16, 2014