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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
District of Maryland

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Catonsville Man Charged with Making Threats by Telephone and Email

Threatened a Woman and Her Family

Baltimore, Maryland – A federal criminal complaint has been filed charging Stephen Charles Williams-Hill, age 32, of Catonsville, Maryland, today for allegedly using a telephone and emails to threaten to kill, intimidate, or injure the victims and their residence by means of an explosive, and communicating in interstate commerce, a threat to kidnap or injure another person. 

The criminal complaint was announced by United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Rod J. Rosenstein; Special Agent in Charge Gordon B. Johnson of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Baltimore Field Office; Chief James W. Johnson of the Baltimore County Police Department; Commissioner Kevin Davis of the Baltimore Police Department, as part of the FBI Joint Violent Crimes Task Force; and Chief Chris Magnus of the Tucson Police Department.

According to the affidavit, from July through October 2016, Williams-Hill, using the name Gio Calle, made numerous threats to the victim and her family.  The affidavit alleges that Williams-Hill called, emailed and left messages, for the victim, her mother and her sibling.  In those calls and emails Williams-Hill allegedly threatened to blow up the building where the mother worked, blow up the family’s residence, kill, maim and torture the victim and the members her family.  Williams-Hill claimed to have a semiautomatic weapon, that he threatened to use to kill the family and individuals at the mother’s work place.  According to the affidavit, on several occasions Williams-Hill stated that he’d been wanting to kill someone since he was six years old.

If convicted, Williams-Hill faces a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison for using a telephone and emails to threaten to kill, intimidate, or injure the victims and their residence by means of an explosive; and a maximum of five years in prison for communicating in interstate commerce, a threat to kidnap or injure another person.  Williams-Hill had an initial appearance this afternoon in U.S. District Court in Baltimore and was detained pending a detention hearing scheduled for November 3, 2016 at 2:00 p.m.

A criminal complaint is not a finding of guilt.  An individual charged by criminal complaint is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty at some later criminal proceedings. 

United States Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein commended the FBI, Baltimore City and Baltimore County Police Departments and the Tucson, Arizona Police Department for their work in the investigation.  Mr. Rosenstein thanked Assistant U.S. Attorney John W. Sippel, Jr. who is prosecuting the case.

Updated November 2, 2016