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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
District of Minnesota

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Prosecutions Continue In Illegal Entry Cases Involving Those With Prior Criminal Records


MINNEAPOLIS – In the District of Minnesota, separate charges have been filed against two Mexican nationals who allegedly entered the United States illegally after being deported as criminals.

The first indictment alleges that on May 1, 2013, authorities found Juan Manuel Contreras-Lepe, age 61, in the U.S. illegally after he had been previously deported to Mexico. His deportation followed a 1995 Florida conviction for felony aggravated battery. On May 1, 2013, authorities identified Contreras-Lepe, also known as Ezekiel Hernandez-Sandoval, as an alien with a criminal record after a traffic stop near his Willmar residence.

If convicted of the federal charge now levied against him, Contreras-Lepe faces a potential maximum penalty of 20 years in federal prison, followed by deportation. Any sentence would be determined by a federal district court judge. This case is the result of an investigation by ICE’s Enforcement and Removal Operations (“ICE ERO”). It is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Deidre Y. Aanstad.

The second indictment alleges that on May 7, 2013, authorities found Alfredo Rios-Guzman, age 35, illegally in the U.S. after he had been previously deported to Mexico. His deportation followed a 2007 Hennepin County conviction for assault in the second degree, involving a dangerous weapon. On May 7, 2013, after a traffic stop near his Bloomington residence, Rios-Guzman was identified as an alien with a criminal record.

If convicted of the federal charge now filed against him, Rios-Guzman faces a potential maximum penalty of 20 years in federal prison, followed by deportation. Any sentence would be determined by a federal district court judge. This case is the result of an investigation by the ICE ERO. It is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Sarah E. Hudleston.

In some instances, federal prosecution will occur only after the individual is prosecuted for the recent underlying offense. The men in these cases will remain in custody until their current federal cases are resolved.

An indictment is a determination by a grand jury that there is probable cause to believe that offenses have been committed by a defendant. A defendant, of course, is presumed innocent until he or she pleads guilty or is proven guilty at trial.

 

 

Updated April 30, 2015