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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Northern District of West Virginia

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Bridgeport, WV Doctor Convicted In Painkiller Distribution Network


1125 Chapline Street, Federal Building, Suite 3000 ● Wheeling, WV 26003
(304) 234-0100 ● Contact: Tara Tighe, Public Affairs Specialist

CLARKSBURG, WEST VIRGINIA – Dr. Edita Milan, 75, of Fairmont, West Virginia, was convicted today in federal court on charges that she unlawfully distributed prescription painkillers through her Bridgeport, West Virginia medical practice, United States Attorney William J. Ihlenfeld, II, announced.

“Today’s hearing is the end game for Dr. Milan, who let her greed overcome her morals and common sense and whose prescribing practices led to multiple overdose deaths,” said Ihlenfeld. “The U.S. Attorney’s Office remains committed to working with our state and local partners to ensure that pharmaceutical drugs are being used for legitimate medical needs, and I commend the Greater Harrison County Drug & Violent Crimes Task Force for helping to bring this doctor to justice. I’m hopeful that prosecutions like this one will lead to a reduction in prescription drug overdoses in North Central West Virginia.”

The prescribing practices of Dr. Milan first came under suspicion through various citizen complaints. An investigation revealed that Dr. Milan repeatedly prescribed excessive amounts of prescription painkillers outside the course of professional conduct for no legitimate medical reason.

Dr. Milan pled no contest to the following charges:

• One count of “Maintaining a Drug Involved Premises,” for which she faces up to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $200,000.00.
• One count of “Distribution of Schedule III and IV Substances.” She faces up to ten years in prison and a fine of up to $500,000.00 on the Schedule III charge and up to five years in prison and fine of up to $250,000.00 on the Schedule IV charge.
• One count of “Distribution of Schedule II and IV Substances.” She faces up to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $1,000,000.00 on the Schedule II charge and up to five years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000.00 on the Schedule IV charge.
• Two counts of “Distribution of Schedule II Controlled Substances.” She faces up to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $1,000,000.00 on each count.

Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, the actual sentence imposed will be based upon the seriousness of the offenses and the prior criminal history, if any, of the defendant.

Dr. Milan’s plea of no contest, which has the same legal effect as a guilty plea, was accepted over the objection of the government.

Assistant U.S. Attorneys John Parr, Andrew Cogar, and Sarah Montoro prosecuted the case on behalf of the government. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and the Greater Harrison County Drug and Violent Crime Task Force, a HIDTA-funded initiative, are leading the investigation.

U.S. District Judge Irene M. Keeley presided.

Updated January 7, 2015