You are here

Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Western District of North Carolina

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, March 22, 2018

U.S. Army Reserve Soldier Arrested And Charged With Sex Trafficking And Related Offenses

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – An indictment was unsealed today in federal court following the arrest of Xaver Boston, 28, of Charlotte, announced Acting Assistant Attorney General John Gore of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, U.S. Attorney R. Andrew Murray of the Western District of North Carolina, and Special Agent in Charge John Strong of the FBI Charlotte, North Carolina, Field Division. The indictment charges Boston with six counts of sex trafficking, one count of inducing a person to travel in interstate commerce for purposes of prostitution, and two counts of using an interstate facility to promote a prostitution enterprise.

According to the indictment, between 2012 and Spring 2016, and again between Spring 2017 and September 2017, the defendant operated a prostitution enterprise and sex trafficked young women, including one minor girl.  The defendant advertised the women on Backpage.com and collected the prostitution proceeds for his own profit.  He provided the women with drugs, including heroin, to maintain control of their actions, and he used violence as punishment when he suspected they were withholding proceeds from him, lying to him, or not following his directions.

An indictment is merely an accusation, and the defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.  Each sex trafficking count carries a minimum sentence of 15 years in prison and a maximum sentence of life, as well as mandatory restitution and a $250,000 fine.

The case is being investigated by the FBI in Charlotte and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department. The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Kimlani M. Ford of the Western District of North Carolina and Trial Attorney Matthew T. Grady of the Civil Rights Division’s Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit.

 

Topic(s): 
Human Trafficking
Updated March 22, 2018