Jurisdiction and Relationship to the Office of the Inspector General

OPR is an office separate from the litigating components of the Department.  OPR’s Director is a nonpartisan member of the Senior Executive Service appointed by the Attorney General. 

OPR has exclusive jurisdiction to investigate allegations of misconduct made against Department attorneys and law enforcement personnel that relate to the attorneys' exercise of their authority to investigate, litigate, or provide legal advice.  OPR also has jurisdiction to investigate allegations of misconduct against Department law enforcement personnel that relate to allegations of attorney misconduct within the jurisdiction of OPR. 

The U.S. Department of Justice Office of the Inspector General (OIG) is a separate office with the mission to detect and deter waste, fraud, and abuse by Department personnel and programs.  Therefore, the OIG ordinarily will refer to OPR allegations that reflect on the professional conduct and ethics of a Department attorney.  Similarly, OPR ordinarily will refer to the OIG allegations against a Department attorney that are unrelated to the attorney’s authority to investigate, litigate, or provide legal advice. 

For example, OPR would investigate an allegation that a Department attorney failed to comply with the government’s discovery obligations in a criminal case, but would refer to the OIG an allegation that a Department employee failed to comply with time and attendance or travel rules and regulations. 

OPR and the OIG share jurisdiction to investigate allegations of whistleblower retaliation made by current, former, and prospective employees of the FBI.  Individuals who suffered an actual or threatened adverse personnel action in retaliation for a protected disclosure may file a whistleblower retaliation complaint with OPR or the OIG.

Updated June 5, 2019

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