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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Eastern District of Pennsylvania

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Former Owner of Durable Medical Equipment Supplier to Pay $220,000 to Resolve Civil False Claims Allegations

PHILADELPHIA – Victor Saul, of Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey and a former owner of R&V Medical Supplies LLC (R&V), has agreed to pay $220,000 to resolve civil claims under the False Claims Act. The government’s claims concern allegations of fraud in connection with the sale of durable medical equipment. The civil resolution was announced today by Acting United States Attorney Louis D. Lappen.  

 

Victor Saul owned R&V together with his brother, Robert Saul, and Robert’s wife, Sheila Saul. R&V was a supplier of durable medical equipment that provided wheelchairs, braces, scooters, heating pads and other products to the elderly and the infirm. The government alleges that R&V engaged in an extensive scheme to defraud the Medicare program from approximately 2005 through 2008. The United States alleges that through R&V, Victor Saul caused to be submitted – by acting in reckless disregard of R&V’s scheme – false claims for reimbursement for durable medical equipment to Medicare. Specifically, the United States contends that R&V, through its principals:   

 

  • directed individuals who worked at doctors’ offices to write prescriptions, to prepare medical authorizations and/or physician orders that were not ordered or authorized by a physician;
  • either forged doctors’ signatures or directed other individuals to forge doctors’ signatures on these documents;
  • provided equipment to patients that was not ordered by submitting false claims for payment for patients with falsified physician orders or medical authorizations;
  • billed for medical equipment and supplies that were never provided to any patient;
  • paid remuneration in the form of kickbacks to employees of medical providers and social service agencies in exchange for confidential information, including names, social security numbers, insurance information and other personal information that was used to submit these false claims. 

 

Victor Saul’s brother, Robert Saul, was charged criminally and was sentenced in 2011 to 66 months in prison for Medicare fraud and other related offenses. In addition to the prison term, Robert Saul was ordered to pay $845,000 in restitution, a fine of $10,000, and a special assessment of $10,500. R&V was also charged criminally and was sentenced to five years of probation, a fine of $8,000, and a special assessment of $42,000.

  

As part of the agreement to resolve the government’s claims under the False Claims Act, Victor Saul did not admit to any liability or wrongdoing.

 

The allegations arose from an investigation led by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General. The case was handled by Assistant United States Attorney David A. Degnan.

Topic(s): 
False Claims Act
Updated September 21, 2017