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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Eastern District of Pennsylvania

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, March 15, 2018

Pennsylvania Men Sentenced to Prison for Running Fraudulent Tax Return Ring

Two Philadelphia men were sentenced to prison for conspiring to file fraudulent tax refund claims, announced U.S. Attorney Louis D. Lappen for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania and Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard E. Zuckerman of the Justice Department’s Tax Division.

Moise Olivier, 28, a member of the conspiracy, was sentenced today to serve three months in prison, followed by three years of supervised release, and was ordered to pay $181,805.10 in restitution and a $100 special assessment.  Hans Pierre, another member of the conspiracy, was sentenced last month to serve three months in prison.  Pierre, 29, was also sentenced to three years of supervised release following his prison sentence and ordered to pay $95,157.41 in restitution and a $100 special assessment. 

According to documents and information provided to the court, Olivier and Pierre conspired with others to use stolen IDs to file tax returns with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) fraudulently seeking tax refunds.  Although neither man had a tax preparation business, Olivier opened up a bank account in the name of “Moise Olivier Tax Service” and Pierre opened up two bank accounts in the name of “Hans Pierre Tax Service” to facilitate the crime.  Their co-conspirators directed the IRS to deposit some of the fraudulently obtained refunds into these bank accounts.  Olivier and Pierre withdrew money from their bank accounts to provide to other co-conspirators, and they kept a substantial portion of the illegal proceeds for their own use.  Olivier admitted to causing a tax loss of $181,805.10.  Pierre admitted to causing a tax loss of $95,157.41.

In addition to these sentences, U.S. District Judge John R. Padova sentenced the other defendants as follows:

  • Steeve Zamor, who recruited other individuals to join the scheme, was sentenced to 22 months in prison and three years of supervised release, and ordered to pay $366,135.53 in restitution and a $100 special assessment.
     
  • Shamback Francois was sentenced to eight months in prison and three years of supervised release, and ordered to pay $425,841.14 in restitution and a $200 special assessment.
     
  • Douge Francois was sentenced to four months in prison in prison and three years of supervised release, and ordered to pay $32,300 in restitution and a $100 special assessment.

 

  • Daniel Monville was sentenced to three months in prison and three years of supervised release, and ordered to pay $155,789.23 in restitution and a $400 special assessment.

 

  • Peterson Blanc was sentenced to three months in prison and three years of supervised release, and ordered to pay $100,049.10 in restitution and a $700 special assessment.

 

  • Stanley Jean was sentenced to three months in a halfway house and five years of probation, and ordered to pay $129,000 in restitution and a $200 special assessment.
     
  • Jean Celestin was sentenced to two months in prison and three years of supervised release, and ordered to pay $118,000 in restitution and a $100 special assessment.
     
  • Ronald LaFortune was sentenced to two months of home confinement and three years of probation, and ordered to pay $118,000 in restitution and a $100 special assessment.
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Zamor, Douge Francois, Blanc, Monville, and LaFortune all face potential immigration proceedings as a result of their felony convictions.

U.S. Attorney Lappen and  Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Zuckerman commended special agents of IRS Criminal Investigation and the FBI, who conducted the investigation, and Trial Attorney Eric B. Powers of the Tax Division and Assistant U.S. Attorney David Ignall, who prosecuted the case.

Topic(s): 
Financial Fraud
Updated March 28, 2018