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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
District of Kansas

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Hunters In Kansas Plead Guilty To Violating Migratory Bird Act

WICHITA, KAN. – Seven hunters in Kansas pleaded guilty and were sentenced Wednesday for violating the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, U.S. Attorney Barry Grissom said.

The men admitted they violated the federal law protecting migratory birds when they participated in an annual opening weekend dove hunt in Graham County, Kan., on Sept. 1-2, 2013.

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act classifies mourning doves as migratory game birds. It classifies owls as migratory non-game birds. Restrictions on hunting mourning doves include a daily bag limit of 15 and a possession limit of three times the daily bag limit.

PLEAS

Defendants pleading and sentenced were:

Daniel R. Dinkel, 63, Hill City, Kan., one count of exceeding the daily bag limit for mourning doves.
Kent A. Webber, 52, Derby, Kan., one count of exceeding the daily bag limit for mourning doves, and one count of taking an owl.
Evan Webber, 25, Derby, Kan., one count of exceeding the daily bag limit for mourning doves, and one count of taking an owl.
Kenneth R. Beran, 67, Derby, Kan., one count of exceeding the daily bag limit for mourning doves.
Clark Law, 57, Hill City, Kan., one count of exceeding the daily bag limit for mourning doves.
Tracy D. Higgins, 54, El Dorado, Kan., one count of exceeding the daily bag limit for mourning doves, and one count of taking an owl.
John Kobler, 62, Topeka, Kan., one count of exceeding the daily bag limit for mourning doves.

Another defendant, George Morgan, 52, Gordonville, Texas, who is charged with one count of exceeding the daily bag limit for mourning doves, is set for a change of plea hearing Nov. 24.

SENTENCES

Dinkel, Kobler, Law and Beran were sentenced to a year on probation in which they are not allowed to hunt, fish or trap, a $2,000 fine, and $3,000 restitution to the state of Kansas.

Kent Weber, Evan Weber and Higgins were sentenced to two years on probation in which they are not allowed to hunt, fish or trap, a $2,000 fine and $5,000 restitution.

Grissom commended the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service investigated. Assistant U.S. Attorney Matt Treaster is prosecuting.

Component(s): 
Updated December 15, 2014