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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Northern District of Ohio

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, June 22, 2018

Eleven people indicted for being in Ohio after having been previously deported and/or convicted of crimes in the U.S.

Eleven people who were found to be in Ohio after having been deported were indicted for illegally reentering the United States.

Eight of those indicted were found to be in Ohio on June 5. They are: Maurilio Perez-Morales, 47; Omar Rovelero-Morales, 37, ; Cutberto Gallardo-Trujillo, 49; Epigmenio Sifuentes-Cabrera (aka Jose Fernandez-Cabrerra), 35; Josefino Alvaro Leon-Herrera, 52; Bersain Alvarez-Lopez, 30; Dalila Molina-Vazquez, 29, and Isias Roblero-Perez, 39. All are Mexican citizens.

Perez-Morales, Rovelero-Morales, Sifuentes-Cabrera, Alvarez-Lopez, Roblero-Perez and Molina-Vazquez were found in Ohio on June 5 after having been previously deported.

Gallardo-Trujillo was found in Ohio on June 5 after having previously been deported and previously convicted of delivery of cocaine. Leon-Herrera was found in Ohio on June 5 after having been deported and previously convicted of trafficking marijuana.

Edgar Samuel Palomino-Sanchez, 25, of Mexico, was found to be in Ohio on May 28 after having been previously deported.

Miguel Sanchez Ceto, of Guatemala, would found to be in Ohio on May 21 after having been previously deported.

Pedro Luis Martinez-Navarro, of Honduras, was found to be in Ohio on May 26 after having been previously deported.

These cases were investigated U.S. Customs and Border Patrol andImmigration and Customs Enforcement, Department of Homeland Security.

If convicted, the defendant’s sentence will be determined by the Court after review of factors unique to this case, including the defendant’s prior criminal record, if any, the defendant’s role in the offense and the characteristics of the violations.  In all cases, the sentence will not exceed the statutory maximum and, in most cases, it will be less than the maximum.

An indictment is a charge and is not evidence of guilt. A defendant is entitled to a fair trial in which it will be the government's burden to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

Topic(s): 
Immigration
Component(s): 
Contact: 
Mike Tobin 216.622.3651 michael.tobin@usdoj.gov
Updated June 22, 2018