You are here

Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Southern District of Iowa

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, January 31, 2022

Multiple Individuals Sentenced to Prison as a Result of Joint Federal and State Investigations of Drug Trafficking Organizations in Burlington

DAVENPORT, IA – Tristan Davis, of Burlington, was sentenced on January 28, 2022, to over 23 years in prison for his involvement in a drug conspiracy dating back to 2001. He is the last of eight defendants to be sentenced after they were charged in November 2019. Davis, age 36, originally from Shreveport, Louisiana, was sentenced to 280 months in federal prison. There is no parole in the federal prison system.

Davis was previously found guilty, along with Kendrick Page and Breon Armstrong, of Conspiracy to Distribute Controlled Substances, which included ice methamphetamine and cocaine base (crack cocaine), after a jury trial in July 2021. At sentencing, United States District Court Chief Judge John A. Jarvey found Davis possessed a firearm related to his drug trafficking activities and maintained a house in Burlington to store, manufacture and distribute controlled substances. At sentencing, Chief Judge Jarvey described the conspiracy as “a scourge upon Burlington and eastern Iowa.” He went on to say the conspiracy was responsible for “huge quantities of methamphetamine and other controlled substances over a very long period of time.”

Davis was one of eight individuals from Burlington who were charged federally in November 2019, after the execution of numerous federal search warrants in Burlington, and elsewhere.

Others charged, and sentenced, as a part of this drug conspiracy include:


• Kendrick Ramon Page, sentenced to 28 years and 4 months of imprisonment
• Breon Raquon Armstrong, sentenced to 17 ½ years of imprisonment
• Alphonso Edmond, sentenced to 15 years of imprisonment
• Lavelle Harris, sentenced to 21 years and 8 months of imprisonment
• Lamar Harris, sentenced to 17 ½ years of imprisonment
• Frederrick Dewayne Reed, sentenced to 13 years and 4 months imprisonment
• Michael Rees, sentenced to 12 years and 7 months of imprisonment

These charges stem from an investigation conducted by numerous federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies, including: the Southeast Iowa Narcotics Taskforce; Burlington Police Department; Des Moines County Sheriff’s Office; Federal Bureau of Investigation; West Central Illinois Taskforce; Quincy, Illinois, Police Department; Drug Enforcement Administration; Iowa Division of Narcotics Enforcement; Henry County Sheriff’s Office; Mt. Pleasant Police Department; West Burlington Police Department; Keokuk Police Department; Ft. Madison Police Department; Lee County Sheriff’s Office; Iowa City Police Department; Johnson County Sheriff’s Office; North Liberty Police Department; Coralville Police Department; Muscatine County Sheriff’s Office; Louisa County Sheriff’s Office; Washington County Sheriff’s Office; Bettendorf Police Department; Illinois State Police; Monmouth, Illinois, Police Department; Macomb, Illinois, Police Department; Galesburg, Illinois, Police Department; Adams County, Illinois, Sheriff’s Office; and Fulton County, Illinois, Sheriff’s Office.

The United States Attorney’s Office in the Southern District of Iowa has prioritized the prosecution of those responsible for drug and violent offenses in Southeast Iowa, to include the Burlington area. “The Department of Justice is committed to continue to collaborate with our state and local partners to address violent crime that threatens safety in communities like Burlington. This investigation, and others like it, demonstrates the continued resolve of our federal, state and local law enforcement officers to hold accountable those who engage in drug trafficking and the act of violence that go with it,” stated United States Attorney Richard D. Westphal.

Most recently, in November 2021, eight men were federally charged with participating in a methamphetamine conspiracy after several federal search warrants were executed at Burlington residences. Those charged in November 2021 include: Clyde Stewart, Jr.; Rudolph Allen; Kendric Childs; Brian Davis, Jr.; Demetrius Goudy; Gregory Johnson; Marcus Johnson; and one other individual who remains at large. The public is reminded that charges contain only accusations and are not evidence of guilt. The defendants are presumed innocent and entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

Since 2019, twenty-two individuals from Burlington have been sentenced to federal prison for their roles in trafficking methamphetamine in Southeast Iowa.

Others from Burlington who have been recently federally prosecuted include:


John Patrick Auwaerter, sentenced to 15 years of imprisonment
Case Number 3:18-cr-101
Michael Lee Davis, sentenced to 10 years of imprisonment
Case Number 3:18-cr-102
Rachel Marie Horn, sentenced to 20 years of imprisonment
Case Number 3:19-cr-6
Gerald Victor Terry, sentenced to 20 years of imprisonment
Case Number 3:19-cr-19
Pamela Sue Hester, sentenced to 10 years and 10 months of imprisonment
Case Number 3:19-cr-41
Michael Antonio Davison, sentenced to 26 years and 8 months of imprisonment
Case Number 3:19-cr-43
Norris Davison, sentenced to 15 years and 8 months of imprisonment
Case Number 3:19-cr-43
Wilbert James Bowers, sentenced to 12 years and 8 months of imprisonment
Case Number 3:19-cr-43
Justin Harold Love, sentenced to 10 years and 10 months of imprisonment
Case Number 3:19-cr-43
Anthony Collins, sentenced to 12 years of imprisonment
Case Number 3:19-cr-46
Charles Lester Warner, sentenced to 12 years and 7 months of imprisonment
Case Number 3:19-cr-87
Lloyd Davenport, sentenced to 21 years and 10 months of imprisonment
Case Number 3:19-cr-91
Allen Julian Fields, Jr., sentenced to 10 years and 1 month of imprisonment
Case Number 3:19-cr-117
Terry Lee Douglas III, sentenced to 16 years and 8 months of imprisonment
Case Number 3:20-cr-42

Topic(s): 
Drug Trafficking
Contact: 
Rachel J. Scherle 515-473-9300 USAIAS-PAO@usdoj.gov
Updated February 1, 2022