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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Southern District of West Virginia

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, August 10, 2015

Detroit man pleads guilty in federal court to selling heroin

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. – A Detroit man who sold heroin to undercover agents on multiple occasions in March of 2015 pleaded guilty today to a federal drug charge, announced U.S. Attorney Booth Goodwin.  Bryant D. Long, II, 28, entered a guilty plea in federal court in Huntington to distributing heroin.

On March 13, 2015, Long agreed to meet with undercover DEA agents in Huntington, where he sold them 8.5 grams of heroin for $1,200.  During the meeting, Long also made arrangements with the agents for future heroin sales.  The heroin distributed by Long was confirmed through laboratory testing to contain heroin and Fentanyl, a schedule II painkiller that is particularly dangerous when mixed with heroin.  On March 23, 2015, Long met with agents again, and sold an additional 9.8 grams of heroin in exchange for $1,250.

On March 30, 2015, Long was arrested after agents executed a search warrant at 504 Marcum Terrace in Huntington. Agents seized additional heroin during the search and Long admitted that he had been in Huntington for the prior month distributing heroin and crack cocaine.    

Long faces up to 20 years in federal prison, and is scheduled to be sentenced on November 9, 2015.

The United States Drug Enforcement Administration conducted the investigation.  Assistant United States Attorney Joseph F. Adams is responsible for the prosecution.

This case is being prosecuted as part of an ongoing effort led by the United States Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of West Virginia to combat the illicit sale and misuse of prescription drugs and heroin. The U.S. Attorney’s Office, joined by federal, state and local law enforcement agencies, is committed to aggressively pursuing and shutting down illegal pill trafficking, eliminating open air drug markets, and curtailing the spread of opiate painkillers and heroin in communities across the Southern District.

Updated August 10, 2015