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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Southern District of West Virginia

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, February 1, 2019

Multiple Project Safe Childhood (PSC) Defendants Appear in Federal Court

CHARLESTON, W.Va. –  United States Attorney Mike Stuart announced that multiple Project Safe Childhood (PSC) defendants appeared in federal court this week. 

“Project Safe Childhood cases are a significant priority for my office,” said United States Attorney Mike Stuart.  “These crimes are horrific and we will do everything within our power to protect children from the likes of the defendants that appeared in court this week. Crimes against children are epidemic in the nation today. The children of this district have no better champion than my office. We will continue to fight for them every single day and we will do all we can to protect our kids from the monsters that prey upon them.” 

Douglas James Allmon, 51, of Canton, Ohio, pled guilty before United States District Judge Joseph R. Goodwin to attempting to entice a minor to engage in illegal sexual activity and traveling in interstate commerce in order to engage in illicit sexual activity with a minor.  Allman admitted that during August and September 2018 he communicated via text message with a minor he believed to be a 14-year-old girl in Parkersburg, West Virginia. During the conversations, Allmon attempted to persuade and entice the minor to meet him in order to engage in sexual intercourse. On September 7, 2018, Allmon traveled from his home in Ohio to Parkersburg, West Virginia, in order to have sex with the minor. Only then did Allmon discover that the minor was actually an undercover law enforcement officer.  The investigation was conducted by the West Virginia State Police, the West Virginia States Police Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force, the FBI Violent Crimes Against Children Task Force, and the Parkersburg Police Department. 

Allmon faces at least 10 years and up to life in federal prison when he is sentenced on April 17, 2019. Upon his release from prison, he will be required to serve a term of supervised release of at least five years and up to life. He will also be required to register as a sex offender.

Richard Gerald Caudill, Jr., 46, of Catlettsburg, Kentucky, pled guilty before United States District Judge Robert C. Chambers to traveling in interstate commerce in order to engage in illicit sexual activity with a minor.  Caudill admitted that during August 2018 he communicated via the cell phone messaging app Kik with a minor he believed to be a 14-year-old girl from the Ashland, Kentucky area. During the conversations, Caudill attempted to persuade and entice the minor to meet him in order to engage in sexual intercourse. On August 28, 2018, Caudill traveled from his home in Kentucky to a location in Kenova, Wayne County, West Virginia, in order to have sex with the minor. Only then did Caudill discover that the minor was actually an undercover law enforcement officer. The investigation was conducted by the West Virginia State Police Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force, the FBI Violent Crimes Against Children Task Force, and the Ashland Police Department. 

Caudill faces up to 30 years in federal prison when he is sentenced on May 20, 2019. Upon his release from prison, he will be required to serve a term of supervised release of at least five years and up to life. He will also be required to register as a sex offender.

David Wayne Young, 48, of Ashland, Kentucky was sentenced by United States District Judge John T. Copenhaver, Jr. to 188 months in federal prison, followed by 25 years on supervised release for a sex trafficking crime.  He also will be required to register as a sex offender.  Stuart commended the investigative efforts of the FBI Violent Crimes Against Children Task Force, the West Virginia State Police, the West Virginia Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force, the Ashland Police Department, and the Boyd County Sheriff’s Department.

Young previously admitted that in March 2017, he communicated with his codefendant, Misty Dawn Baisden, and asked Baisden to provide him with a minor under the age of 14 for the purpose of engaging in commercial sexual activity. Young additionally admitted that the communication involved discussion of exchanging money, items, or other things of value for sexually explicit photographs of the minor. He further admitted that subsequent communications with Baisden included discussions that involved Young offering to provide Baisden with a minor for sexual activity in exchange for her providing him with a minor for sexual activity.  Baisden previously pleaded guilty to conspiracy to engage in sex trafficking of a minor and was sentenced to 72 months in prison.

Nathan Kelley, 22, of Vienna, West Virginia, was sentenced by United States District Judge John T. Copenhaver, Jr. to six years in federal prison, followed by 25 years of supervised release, for child pornography crimes.  He will also be required to register as a sex offender.  Kelley previously entered his guilty plea to one count of distribution or attempted distribution of child pornography, and one count of possessing child pornography.  Stuart commended the investigative work of the Parkersburg Police Department and the West Virginia State Police. 

Kelley admitted to using his phone to send images depicting child pornography through Twitter to another person on November 18, 2017, at his residence in Wood County. He also admitted to possessing about 220 images and one video depicting child pornography on December 27, 2017, also at his residence in Wood County.  He indicated that he acquired all of the images and the video from the Internet and stored them on his phone in an app called Keepsafe.  Many of the images involved prepubescent children being subjected to sexually explicit conduct. The Court also found that on at least two prior occasions Kelley had sexually abused a toddler by touching her bare genitals for his own sexual gratification.

Assistant United States Attorney Jennifer Rada Herrald is in charge of the prosecutions.

These cases were prosecuted as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative of the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. Led by the United States Attorney’s Offices and the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state, and local resources to locate, apprehend, and prosecute those who sexually exploit children, and to identify and rescue victims. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

 

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Topic(s): 
Project Safe Childhood
Updated February 1, 2019