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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Middle District of Florida

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, November 13, 2015

Cape Coral Woman Sentenced For Making False Workers’ Compensation Claim

Tampa, Florida – U.S. District Judge Charlene Edwards Honeywell sentenced Theresa A. Aley (52, Cape Coral) on October 30, 2015, to three years of probation, including a 60-day period of house arrest, for making a false statement regarding federal workers’ compensation benefits.  The court also ordered her to pay $83,465 in restitution to the federal government, which amount was paid in full on November 10, 2015. Aley pleaded guilty on June 16, 2015.

According to court documents, in April 1998, Aley, while employed as a Customer Survey Program Manager at Bolling Air Force Base in Maryland, reported that she had fallen in the ladies’ restroom and had injured her lower spine. As a result, she was listed as completely disabled by July 1999.  Following that alleged injury, Aley made application for and was approved to receive federal employee’s compensation benefits.

Each year, Aley was required to submit a form to the Department of Labor indicating that she was not self-employed or involved in any business enterprise, and that she did not perform any volunteer work.  Following her submission of this form in April 2014, an investigation revealed that her statement was false.  Specifically, videotaped surveillance, interviews, and business records amassed during the investigation revealed that Aley, along with her husband, was involved in and worked for Aley Enterprises, a magazine distribution business in Cape Coral.  Aley presented herself as the owner of Aley Enterprises. She was listed on the business checking account and endorsed most of the checks deposited into that account. She also handled most of the business operations, including routinely interacting with customers and managing customer accounts.  Records show that money was transferred from the business checking account to Aley’s personal savings account. In addition, on multiple occasions, Aley was observed at the business climbing into the bed of a pickup truck; removing plastic wrapping from pallets of boxes; lifting, carrying, and loading boxes into the back of vehicles; moving pallets around the warehouse; and delivering magazines to several businesses in the Cape Coral area.

This case was investigated by the Air Force Office of Special Investigations. It was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Josie Thomas.

Attachment(s): 
Topic(s): 
Financial Fraud
Component(s): 
Updated February 25, 2016