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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Northern District of Oklahoma

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, January 12, 2015

Federal Grand Jury Criminal Indictments Announced

TULSA, Okla. — The results of the January 2015 Federal Grand Jury were announced today by Danny C. Williams Sr., United States Attorney for the Northern District of Oklahoma.
The following individuals have been charged with violations of United States law in indictments returned by the Grand Jury. The return of an indictment is a method of informing a defendant of alleged federal crimes which must be proven in a court of law beyond a reasonable doubt to overcome a defendant’s presumption of innocence.

Roy James Hudson. Felon in Possession of Firearm and Ammunition, Possession of an Unregistered Weapon Made from a Shotgun, and Possession of an Unregistered Weapon Made from a Rifle. Hudson, 28, of Pryor, Oklahoma, is charged with possessing 13 firearms and various rounds of ammunition after prior felony convictions. The firearms include unregistered short-barreled weapons made from a shotgun and a rifle. If convicted, the minimum statutory penalty for possession of the firearms and ammunition after felony convictions is 15 years in prison and the maximum statutory penalty is life in prison. If convicted, the maximum penalty for possessing unregistered short-barreled weapons made from a shotgun and a rifle is 10 years in prison. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, the Mayes County Sheriff’s Office, and the Pryor Police Department are the investigative agencies.

Mario Jimenez-Ramirez. Reentry of Removed Alien. Jimenez-Ramirez, 36, was arrested and is charged with having returned to the United States unlawfully after being deported in February 2009 near Del Rio, Texas. If convicted, the statutory maximum penalty is 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is the investigating agency.   

Rene Marmolejo-Rodriguez. Reentry of Removed Alien. Marmolejo-Rodriguez, 32, was arrested and is charged with having returned to the United States unlawfully after being deported in November 2009 near San Ysidro, California. If convicted, the statutory maximum penalty is 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is the investigating agency.

Kelly Verd Nichols. Mail Fraud and Unlawful Monetary Transactions. Nichols, 46, of Sapulpa, Oklahoma, is charged with two counts of mail fraud and four counts of unlawful money transactions occurring between December 2009 and June 2010. If convicted, the statutory maximum penalty is not more than 20 years in prison for mail fraud and not more than 10 years in prison for unlawful monetary transactions. The indictment also contains forfeiture allegations which provide notice to the defendant that upon conviction he also faces entry of a forfeiture money judgment in the amount of $267,000. The Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Internal Revenue Service-Criminal Investigation are the investigating agencies.

Beto Romero-Lozada. Reentry of Removed Alien. Romero-Lozada, 43, was arrested and is charged with having returned to the United States unlawfully after being deported in April 2007 near San Ysidro, California. If convicted, the statutory maximum penalty is 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is the investigating agency.   

Jacob Dane Young and Jamie Lee King. Drug Conspiracy, Possession of Marijuana with Intent to Distribute and Possession of Firearms in Furtherance of a Drug Trafficking Crime. Young, 24, and King, 23, both of Tulsa, are charged with possessing marijuana with intent to distribute and conspiring to distribute marijuana. Upon conviction, the defendants face entry of a criminal forfeiture money judgment representing proceeds obtained as a result of the drug conspiracy and any property used to facilitate the drug offenses. Both defendants are also charged with possessing 15 firearms in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime. King is additionally charged with possessing a machine gun in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime. If convicted, the statutory maximum penalty for possessing marijuana with intent to distribute and conspiracy is five years in prison. If convicted, the statutory minimum penalty for possessing firearms in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime is five years in prison and the statutory maximum penalty is life in prison. If convicted, the statutory minimum penalty for possessing a machine gun in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime is 30 years in prison and the statutory maximum penalty is life in prison. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives is the investigating agency.

Updated July 14, 2015