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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Western District of Pennsylvania

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, February 8, 2018

Convicted Heroin Dealer Sentenced to 10 Years in Prison for Trafficking Heroin and Deadly Fentanyl

PITTSBURGH – Henry T. Little-Proctor a/k/a "Bundles", of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, was sentenced in federal court to 10 years in prison as a result of his conviction on multiple charges of violating federal narcotics and firearms laws, United States Attorney Scott W. Brady announced today.

Little-Proctor, age 27, previously pleaded guilty to five counts before United States District Judge Cathy Bissoon.

The court was advised that Little-Proctor conspired to distribute and possessed with intent to distribute both heroin and the even more potent synthetic opiate fentanyl, from late 2015 through July 20, 2016. Specifically, the federal investigation revealed that Little-Proctor was involved with a fentanyl sale on July 13, 2016, and a heroin sale on July 18, 2016. DEA then executed a federal search warrant on July 20, 2016 at a residence utilized by Little-Proctor. There, federal agents located Full Metal Jacketed ammunition for a .223 Rem caliber assault-style rifle and .22 caliber ammunition, as well as 25 "bundles" (250 stamp bags) of heroin. A receipt for the purchase of the .223 Rem caliber ammunition from Gander Mountain was located in the residence and showed that it was purchased on May 14, 2016, along with two extended length magazines for a AR-15 assault-style rifle and a $100 tactical light. The firearms themselves have yet to be located.

Federal law prohibits a person convicted of a prior felony offense from possessing either a firearm or ammunition and the Court was advised that Little-Proctor had been convicted of multiple crimes, including two prior convictions for heroin dealing.

The defendant specifically admitted to selling the fentanyl that caused the July 2016 death of a young woman.

Judge Cathy Bissoon sentenced the defendant to 10 years in prison, followed by six years of supervision by the United States Probation Office and restitution to the victim’s family, after considering the defendant’s criminal, family, educational and work histories.

Assistant United States Attorney Ross E. Lenhardt, of the Violent Crime Section of the U.S. Attorney’s Office, is prosecuting this case on behalf of the government.

Special Agents and Task Force Officers from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and law enforcement officers from the Duquesne Police Department, Homestead Police Department, and Allegheny County Sheriff’s Office conducted the investigation that led to the prosecution of Little-Proctor.

United States Attorney Brady noted that the investigation was funded by the federal Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force program (OCDETF). The OCDETF program supplies critical federal funding and coordination that allows federal, state, and local agencies to work together to successfully identify, investigate, and prosecute major interstate and international drug trafficking organizations and other criminal enterprises.

Topic(s): 
Opioids
Project Safe Neighborhoods
Updated February 8, 2018