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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Western District of Pennsylvania

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Five Facing Charges Relating to the Hustlas Don’t Sleep Drug Trafficking Organization

PITTSBURGH – United States Attorney Scott W. Brady announced today that a federal grand jury in Pittsburgh has returned five separate, but related, indictments charging five Western Pennsylvania residents with drug and/or gun charges relating to an investigation into a group of drug traffickers identifying themselves as "Hustlas Don’t Sleep" (HDS), who sold a variety of controlled substances, including fentanyl, fentanyl analogues, crack cocaine and heroin, primarily out of the McKeesport, Turtle Creek, Wilkinsburg and Monroeville areas of Allegheny County.

The first indictment charges Kristoffer Carlino, 25, of Export, PA with violating federal narcotics laws. According to the one-count Indictment, from on or about July 31, 2019 to on or about November 19, 2019, Carlino conspired to possess with the intent to distribute and distribute 40 grams or more of fentanyl. The law provides for a maximum total sentence of not less than five years and not more than 40 years in prison, a fine of not more than $5,000,000 or both.

The second indictment charges Charles Curry, 29, of Pittsburgh, PA with violating federal narcotics laws. According to the one-count Indictment, in July 2019 to November 19, 2019, Curry conspired with persons known and unknown to possess with the intent to distribute and did distribute 10 grams or more of acetyl fentanyl and quantities of heroin, a Schedule I controlled substance, Schedule I controlled substances, and quantities of fentanyl and cocaine base, Schedule II controlled substances. The law provides for a maximum total sentence of not less than five years to not more than 40 years in prison, a fine not to exceed $5,000,000 or both.

The third indictment charges David Loveings, 66, of Pittsburgh, PA with violating federal narcotics laws. According to the Indictment, from July 2019 through October 2019, Loveings conspired to possess with intent to distribute and distribute 28 grams or more of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of cocaine base, in the form commonly known as crack, a Schedule II controlled substance. The law provides for a maximum total sentence of not less than five years to not more than 40 years in prison, a fine of $5,000,000 or both.

The fourth indictment charges Jason Malos, 36, of North Versailles, PA with violating federal narcotics and firearms laws. According to the two-count Indictment, from on or about July 31, 2019 to on or about November 19, 2019, Malos conspired to possess with the intent to distribute and distribute 40 grams or more of fentanyl. The Indictment also alleges that on or about November 19, 2019, Malos, a convicted felon, possessed a firearm and ammunition. Federal law prohibits a convicted felon from possessing a firearm or ammunition. For the narcotics charge, the law provides for a maximum total sentence of not less than five years and not more than 40 years in prison, a fine of not more than $5,000,000 or both. For the firearm charges, a maximum total sentence of not more than 10 years in prison, a fine of not more than $250,000, or both.

The final indictment charges Andrew Welty, 28, of Everson, PA with violating federal narcotics laws. According to the one-count Indictment, from July 24, 2019 to November 19, 2019, Welty conspired with persons both known and unknown to possess with intent to distribute and did distribute quantities of fentanyl, a Schedule II controlled substance and heroin, a Schedule I controlled substance. The law provides for a maximum total sentence of not less than five years to not more than 40 years in prison, a fine not to exceed $5,000,000 or both.

Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, the actual sentence imposed would be based upon the seriousness of the offense and the prior criminal history, if any, of the defendant(s).

Assistant United States Attorneys Brendan T. Conway and Brian M. Czarnecki are prosecuting this case on behalf of the government.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation, Monroeville Police Department, the Attorney General’s Office, the Drug Enforcement Agency’s Maryland Officer, and the Allegheny County Police Department conducted the investigation leading to the Indictment in this case.

The investigation was funded by the federal Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force Program (OCDETF). The OCDETF program supplies critical federal funding and coordination that allows federal and state agencies to work together to successfully identify, investigate, and prosecute major interstate and international drug trafficking organizations and other criminal enterprises.

An indictment is an accusation. A defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Topic(s): 
Drug Trafficking
Firearms Offenses
Updated February 19, 2020