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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Eastern District of California

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, May 13, 2016

Former DMV Employee Pleads Guilty to Conspiring to Commit Bribery

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Andrew Kimura, 31, of Sacramento, pleaded guilty today to two counts of conspiracy to commit bribery, Acting United States Attorney Phillip A. Talbert announced.

According to court documents, Kimura was an employee of the California Department of Motor Vehicles, working in Sacramento as a Licensing-Registration Examiner. He processed applications for Class A and Class B commercial driver’s licenses (CDLs) and Class C noncommercial driver’s licenses.

According to the plea agreement, between April 2013 and July 2015, Kimura received money from various brokers in order to provide CDLs for individuals who had not taken or passed the necessary DMV examinations. Kimura then accessed the DMV’s database to alter records indicating those individuals had passed certain tests. As a result, the individuals were able to obtain CDLs without having taken or passed the requisite written or behind-the-wheel driving tests. Additionally, Kimura also altered DMV records to provide for renewal of various CDLs in exchange for money from brokers.

This case is the product of an investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), and the California DMV. Assistant United States Attorney Todd A. Pickles and Rosanne Rust are prosecuting the case.

Emma Klem, another DMV employee, and Kulwinder Dosanjh Singh, a broker, previously pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit bribery as part of the same investigation in United States v. Klem, 2:15-cr-139 GEB, and United States v. Kulwinder Dosanjh, 2:15-cr-146 GEB, respectively. No sentencing date has been set for them.

Co-defendants Robert Turchin, Mangal Gil, and Pavitar Dosangh Singh are awaiting trial. The charges against them are only allegations; they are presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

Kimura is scheduled to be sentenced by United States District Judge Garland E. Burrell Jr. on August 12, 2016. Kimura faces a maximum statutory penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The actual sentence, however, will be determined at the discretion of the court after consideration of any applicable statutory factors and the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, which take into account a number of variables.

2:15-cr-161 GEB
Topic: 
Public Corruption
Updated May 13, 2016