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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Eastern District of Kentucky

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, February 11, 2019

Williamsburg Pharmacist Convicted of Unlawful Drug Distribution

LONDON, Ky. – Kimberly Jones, a Williamsburg pharmacist, was convicted last week, by a federal jury sitting in London, on seven counts of unlawful distribution of controlled substances.

Jones, 53, owned and operated Kim’s Hometown Pharmacy in Williamsburg, Kentucky, from approximately 2008 to 2018.  According to the evidence at trial, Jones repeatedly filled prescriptions for significant quantities of Oxycodone and other controlled substances from a variety of out-of-state doctors.  The evidence also established that Jones dispensed controlled substances to certain patients who did not have prescriptions at the time Jones dispensed the drugs.  Following a six-day trial, the jury convicted Jones on seven counts of unlawfully dispensing controlled substances to patients outside the scope of professional practice and not for a legitimate medical purpose.

 Robert M. Duncan, Jr., United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Kentucky; Christopher Evans, Special Agent in Charge, Drug Enforcement Administration; Steven D. Davis, Inspector General, Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, Office of Inspector General; and Daniel R. Levinson, Inspector General, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General, jointly announced the jury’s verdict.        

The investigation was conducted by the Drug Enforcement Administration; the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, Office of Inspector General, Drug Enforcement and Professional Practices Branch; and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General.  Assistant United States Attorney Andrew E. Smith represented the United States in the case. 

Jones will be sentenced by U.S. District Judge Gregory Van Tatenhove.  Jones faces a maximum of 20 years in prison, a fine of up to $1,000,000, and a term of supervision following the service of any sentence.  The Court will consider the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and the applicable federal statutes before imposing a sentence.

 

Topic(s): 
Drug Trafficking
Opioids
Prescription Drugs
Updated February 11, 2019