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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Northern District of California

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, February 11, 2021

Nineteen South Bay Residents Charged In Alleged Scheme To Funnel Drugs Into U.S And Firearms To Mexico

Defendants Allegedly Used Connections To The Sinaloa Cartel To Transport Drugs From Mexico Into The United States

SAN FRANCISCO – A federal grand jury issued a superseding indictment charging fourteen defendants, mostly South Bay residents, with crimes related to two conspiracies—one to transport drugs from Mexico to the San Jose Area, the other to transport firearms illegally from the United States to Mexico, announced United States Attorney David L. Anderson, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Special Agent in Charge Daniel C. Comeaux, and Federal Bureau of Investigation Special Agent in Charge Craig D. Fair.  In a press conference earlier today, U.S. Attorney Anderson announced all the charges were the culmination of a federal investigation—one of four simultaneous investigations into the movement of drugs from Mexico to the streets of the San Jose area.

“One methamphetamine seizure outlined in this indictment represents the largest federal seizure of methamphetamine ever in the Northern District of California,” said U.S. Attorney Anderson.  “The vast majority of these drugs were acquired in Mexico, including from Mexico’s Sinaloa Cartel.  Firearms and their components, as described in the indictment, are acquired in the United States to export to Mexico.  The two-way flow of drug shipments heading north and firearms, including assault weapons, sniper rifles and grenade launchers, heading south is a potently dangerous situation.  It is impossible to characterize this alleged conduct as victimless.”

“Methamphetamine that is pure, potent and cheap has flooded the American market and drug trafficking organizations see an opportunity to profit. They utilize distribution hubs, like the Bay Area, to distribute their poison,” said DEA Special Agent in Charge Daniel C. Comeaux. “As methamphetamine overdoses rise, the significant drug seizures in this investigation has undoubtedly saved lives. DEA will continue to target and to bring to justice these criminal organizations who traffic drugs in our community to keep Americans safe.”

“As a result of Operation Burnt Orange, the FBI and DEA successfully seized 16 firearms, 17.4 pounds of heroin, and 817.7 pounds of methamphetamine from this dangerous organization - which ranks as one of the largest methamphetamine seizures in recent memory here in the Northern District of California,” said FBI Special Agent in Charge Fair.  “Simply put, we won’t allow dangerous and violent groups to use our neighborhoods as a thoroughfare to traffic drugs or as a venue to conduct illegal activity.”

The superseding indictment, filed February 4, 2021, charges David Campoy as the leader of two related conspiracies: a drug trafficking conspiracy and a firearms trafficking conspiracy.  With respect to the drug trafficking conspiracy, David Campoy, his adult son, Jose Melchor Campoy, and co-conspirators David Wilcott Greenman, Kimberly Carrasco, Lamberto (a Mexican national whose last name currently is unknown), Juan Carlos Velazquez Ortiz, Ignacio Espinoza, Jose Manuel Rodriguez Naranjo, and Nicolas Ardanuy are charged with conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine, and marijuana.   David Campoy allegedly used connections with the Cártel de Sinaloa (or Sinaloa Cartel) in Mexico as well as connections in Southern California to obtain methamphetamine and heroin. The indictment alleges David Campoy and Jose Campoy delivered controlled substances to other members of the drug trafficking organization for distribution.  In addition to the conspiracy charge, several of the defendants face additional charges in connection with individual drug sales and use of a communication facility to assist in such sales. 

The facts disclosed in the indictment and additional court documents depict a prolific drug distribution operation.  The indictment describes a drug ledger in which drug purchase orders are recorded in quantities such as of hundreds of kilograms of methamphetamine, and payments are made in the hundreds of thousands of dollars.  In addition, during his arrest in January 2021 with his son and others, law enforcement seized approximately 572 pounds of methamphetamine, several pounds of heroin, and 16 firearms.  In additional court filings the government argues that based on intercepts and intelligence obtained during the investigation, David Campoy, through the quantity he controlled and trafficked, exercised market power over the price and availability of methamphetamine in Northern California. 

With respect to the firearms conspiracy, the indictment alleges David Campoy, Michael Ozuna Guizar, Roberto Campoy Robles, Luis Guillermo Sendino, and Ivan Campoy Morales orchestrated illegal exports to Mexico of weapons and components of firearms for sale in the black market.  The defendants manufactured, exported, and dealt in weapons including assault weapons.  The superseding indictment describes how defendants allegedly unlawfully purchased firearms and components of firearms in the United States through licensed federal firearm dealers.  The defendants allegedly combined the firearms with grenade launchers assembled in Mexico, and attempted to obtain .50 caliber sniper rifles and grenade launchers for resale on the black market.

In sum, the defendants are charged with the crimes and face maximum penalties as indicted in the chart below:

Defendant/Age

Charges

Statute

Maximum Penalties

David Campoy, 46

 

Conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine, and marijuana; Distribution and possession with the intent to distribute methamphetamine; Possession with the intent to distribute heroin; Use of a communication facility in facilitating the commission of a felony under the Controlled Substances Act; Felon in possession of firearms and ammunition; Possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime; Conspiracy to manufacture and deal in firearms; Conspiracy to manufacture and deal in firearms; Conspiracy to export arms and munitions; Unlawfully manufacturing and dealing in firearms; Arms export control act export of arms and munitions

21 U.S.C.

§§ 846, 841(a)(1), (b)(1)(A), and (b)(1)(B)

 

21 U.S.C. § 843(b)

 

 

 

18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(1)

 

 

18 U.S.C. §  924(c)(1)(A)

 

 

18 U.S.C. § 371

 

 

 

18 U.S.C. §§ 922(a)(1)(A) and 924(n) 

 

22 U.S.C. §§ 2778(b)(2) and (c) and 22 C.F.R. §§ 121.1, 123.1, and 127.1  

Lifetime imprisonment

$10 million fine

Lifetime supervised release

 

 

4 years’ imprisonment

$30,000 fine

1 year supervised release

 

10 years’ imprisonment

$250,000 fine

3 years’ supervised release

 

Lifetime imprisonment

$250,000 fine

5 years’ supervised release

 

5 years’ imprisonment

$250,000 fine

3 years’ supervised release

 

10 years’ imprisonment

$250,000 fine

3 years’ supervised release

 

20 years’ imprisonment

$1 million fine

3 years’ supervised release

Jose Melchor Campoy, 21

Conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine, and marijuana; Distribution and possession with the intent to distribute methamphetamine; Possession with the intent to distribute heroin; Use of a communication facility in facilitating the commission of a felony under the Controlled Substances Act

21 U.S.C.

§§ 846, 841(a)(1), (b)(1)(A), and (b)(1)(B)

 

21 U.S.C. § 843(b)

Lifetime imprisonment

$10 million fine

Lifetime supervised release

 

 

4 years’ imprisonment

$30,000 fine

1 year supervised release

David Wolcott Greenman, 34

Conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine, and marijuana; Attempt to possess with the intent to distribute heroin; Distribution and possession with the intent to distribute methamphetamine

21 U.S.C.

§§ 846, 841(a)(1), (b)(1)(A), and (b)(1)(B)

Lifetime imprisonment

$10 million fine

Lifetime supervised release

Kimberly Carrasco, 27

Conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine, and marijuana; Distribution and possession with the intent to distribute methamphetamine;

21 U.S.C.

§§ 846, 841(a)(1) and (b)(1)(A)

Lifetime imprisonment

$10 million fine

Lifetime supervised release

Lamberto LNU, age unknown

Conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine, and marijuana; Use of a communication facility in facilitating the commission of a felony under the Controlled Substances Act

21 U.S.C.

§§ 846, 841(a)(1) and (b)(1)(A)

 

21 U.S.C. § 843(b)

Lifetime imprisonment

$10 million fine

Lifetime supervised release

 

4 years’ imprisonment

$30,000 fine

1 year supervised release

Juan Carlos Velazquez Ortiz, 32

Conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine, and marijuana;

21 U.S.C.

§§ 846, 841(a)(1) and (b)(1)(A)

Lifetime imprisonment

$10 million fine

Lifetime supervised release

Ignacio Espinoza, 30

Conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine, and marijuana; Use of a communication facility in facilitating the commission of a felony under the Controlled Substances Act

21 U.S.C.

§§ 846, 841(a)(1) and (b)(1)(A)

 

21 U.S.C. § 843(b)

Lifetime imprisonment

$10 million fine

Lifetime supervised release

 

4 years’ imprisonment

$30,000 fine

1 year supervised release

Jose Manuel Rodriguez Naranjo, 39

Conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine, and marijuana; Distribution and possession with the intent to distribute methamphetamine

21 U.S.C.

§§ 846, 841(a)(1) and (b)(1)(A)

Lifetime imprisonment

$10 million fine

Lifetime supervised release

Nicholas Ardanuy, 52

Conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine, and marijuana; Distribution and possession with the intent to distribute methamphetamine

21 U.S.C.

§§ 846, 841(a)(1) and (b)(1)(A)

Lifetime imprisonment

$10 million fine

Lifetime supervised release

Michael Ozuna Guizar, 40

Use of a communication facility in facilitating the commission of a felony under the Controlled Substances Act; Conspiracy to manufacture and deal in firearms; Conspiracy to export arms and munitions; Unlawfully manufacturing and dealing in firearms; Arms export control act export of arms and munitions

21 U.S.C. § 843(b)

 

 

 

18 U.S.C. § 371

 

 

 

18 U.S.C. §§ 922(a)(1)(A) and 924(n) 

 

22 U.S.C. §§ 2778(b)(2) and (c) and 22 C.F.R. §§ 121.1, 123.1, and 127.1  

4 years’ imprisonment

$30,000 fine

1 year supervised release

 

5 years’ imprisonment

$250,000 fine

3 years’ supervised release

 

10 years’ imprisonment

$250,000 fine

3 years’ supervised release

 

 

20 years’ imprisonment

$1 million fine

3 years’ supervised release

Miguel Angel Carrizal Zamora, 23

Possession with the intent to distribute and distribution of methamphetamine

21 U.S.C.

§§ 841(a)(1) and (b)(1)(A)

 

Lifetime imprisonment

$10 million fine

Lifetime supervised release

Roberto Campoy Robles, 48

Conspiracy to manufacture and deal in firearms; Conspiracy to export arms and munitions; Unlawfully manufacturing and dealing in firearms; Arms export control act export of arms and munitions

18 U.S.C. § 371

 

 

 

18 U.S.C. §§ 922(a)(1)(A) and 924(n) 

 

22 U.S.C. §§ 2778(b)(2) and (c) and 22 C.F.R. §§ 121.1, 123.1, and 127.1  

5 years’ imprisonment

$250,000 fine

3 years’ supervised release

 

10 years’ imprisonment

$250,000 fine

3 years’ supervised release

 

20 years’ imprisonment

$1 million fine

3 years’ supervised release

Luis Guillermo Sendino, 48

Conspiracy to manufacture and deal in firearms; Conspiracy to export arms and munitions; Unlawfully manufacturing and dealing in firearms; Arms export control act export of arms and munitions

18 U.S.C. § 371

 

 

 

18 U.S.C. §§ 922(a)(1)(A) and 924(n) 

 

22 U.S.C. §§ 2778(b)(2) and (c) and 22 C.F.R. §§ 121.1, 123.1, and 127.1  

5 years’ imprisonment

$250,000 fine

3 years’ supervised release

 

10 years’ imprisonment

$250,000 fine

3 years’ supervised release

 

20 years’ imprisonment

$1 million fine

3 years’ supervised release

Ivan Campoy Morales, age unknown

Conspiracy to manufacture and deal in firearms; Conspiracy to export arms and munitions; Unlawfully manufacturing and dealing in firearms; Arms export control act export of arms and munitions

18 U.S.C. § 371

 

 

 

18 U.S.C. §§ 922(a)(1)(A) and 924(n) 

 

22 U.S.C. §§ 2778(b)(2) and (c) and 22 C.F.R. §§ 121.1, 123.1, and 127.1  

5 years’ imprisonment

$250,000 fine

3 years’ supervised release

 

10 years’ imprisonment

$250,000 fine

3 years’ supervised release

 

20 years’ imprisonment

$1 million fine

3 years’ supervised release

Juan Leopoldo Garate Aguirre, 25

Possession with the intent to distribute and distribution of methamphetamine

21 U.S.C.            §§ 841(a)(1) and (b)(1)(A) 

Lifetime imprisonment

$10 million fine

Lifetime supervised release

Jose Manuel Rodriguez Naranjo, 39

Distribution and possession with the intent to distribute methamphetamine

21 U.S.C.            §§ 841(a)(1) and (b)(1)(A) 

Lifetime imprisonment

$10 million fine

Lifetime supervised release

Miguel Martin Pacheco Martinez, 34

Conspiracy to distribute and possession with the intent to distribute methamphetamine

21 U.S.C.

§§ 846, 841(a)(1) and (b)(1)(A)

Lifetime imprisonment

$10 million fine

Lifetime supervised release

Alberto Martinez Navarro, 36

Conspiracy to distribute and possession with the intent to distribute methamphetamine

21 U.S.C.

§§ 846, 841(a)(1) and (b)(1)(A)

Lifetime imprisonment

$10 million fine

Lifetime supervised release

Miguel Angel Moreno, 46

Distribution and possession with the intent to distribute 500 grams or more of a mixture and substance containing methamphetamine

21 U.S.C.            §§ 841(a)(1) and (b)(1)(A) 

Lifetime imprisonment

$10 million fine

Lifetime supervised release


An indictment and a criminal complaint merely allege that crimes have been committed, and each defendant must be presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.  The court may order additional terms of supervised release and restitution, if appropriate; however, any sentence following conviction would be imposed by the court only after consideration of the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and the federal statute governing the imposition of a sentence, 18 U.S.C. § 3553.

The defendants who are scheduled to appear before the court are as follows:

Defendant

Next Court Date

David Campoy, David Wolcott Greenman, Kimberly Carrasco

 

February 12, 2021

Jose Melchor Campoy, Ignacio Espinoza, Nicholas Ardanuy, Michael Ozuna Guizar, Miguel Angel Carrizal Zamora, Luis Guillermo Sendino, Juan Leopoldo Garate Aguirre, Miguel Martin Pacheco Martinez

February 11, 2021

Miguel Angel Moreno

March 3, 2021

The case is being prosecuted by the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) of the United States Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of California. The investigation of this case was conducted by the DEA and the FBI San Francisco Division. Assistance was provided by FBI Los Angeles, Phoenix and Tuscon; LA IMPACT Group 1; California Highway Patrol; San Jose Police Department the police departments of Santa Clara, Watsonville, Vallejo; the Sheriff’s Offices of Santa Clara County and Santa Cruz County; and the U.S. Marshal Service.

This investigation and prosecution is part of OCDETF, which identifies, disrupts, and dismantles the highest-level drug traffickers, money launderers, gangs, and transnational criminal organizations that threaten the United States by using a prosecutor-led, intelligence-driven, multi-agency approach that leverages the strengths of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies against criminal networks.
 

Updated February 11, 2021