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U.S. vs. Patrick Dai (23-MJ-00632 / 2023R00902)

Important Case Update:

On 4/10/24, Patrick Dai entered a plea of guilty in federal court, admitting that on October 28 and 29, 2023, he posted threatening messages to the Cornell section of an online discussion forum.

A sentencing hearing is scheduled for August 12, 2024 in Syracuse federal court. Dai faces a maximum penalty of five years in prison, a fine up to $250,000, restitution to victims and a maximum of three years of supervised release. A federal district judge will determine any sentence after considering the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

If you feel that you have experienced physical, emotional, psychological, and/or financial harm as a result of Dai’s federal crime, you may be entitled to the following crime victims’ rights:

  1. to be reasonably heard at any public proceeding in the federal district court involving release, plea, sentencing, or any parole proceeding;
  2. to full and timely restitution as provided by law;

Members of the community are welcome to contact U.S. Attorney’s Office Victim Witness Coordinator, Ivy Schoff, by clicking the “Contact Us” box below.

 

Patrick Dai, age 21, a junior at Cornell University who is originally from Pittsford, New York, was arrested on a federal criminal complaint charging him with posting threats to kill or injure another using interstate communications. The complaint, publicly filed in Syracuse, alleges that Dai posted threatening messages to the Cornell section of an online discussion site, including posts calling for violence against Jewish students. The charge filed against Dai carries a maximum term of 5 years in prison, a fine of up to $250,000, and a term of supervised release of up to 3 years.  A defendant’s sentence is imposed by a judge based on the particular statute the defendant is charged with violating, the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other factors.

Victims of federal crimes who have been directly and proximately harmed are entitled to certain access, information, and services under federal law (the Crime Victims’ Rights Act (“CVRA”), Title 18, United States Code, §3771). The CVRA sets forth rights of those who have experienced physical, emotional, psychological, and/or financial harm as a result of a federal crime.
Under the CVRA, a victim of a federal crime has the following rights:

  1. to be reasonably protected from the accused;
  2. to reasonable, accurate, and timely notice of any public court proceeding, or any parole proceeding involving the crime, or of any release or escape of the accused;
  3. to not be excluded from any such public court proceeding, unless the court, after receiving clear and convincing evidence, determines that testimony by the victim would be materially altered if the victim heard other testimony at that proceeding;
  4. to be reasonably heard at any public proceeding in the federal district court involving release, plea, sentencing, or any parole proceeding;
  5. to confer with the attorney(s) for the government in the case;
  6. to full and timely restitution as provided by law;
  7. to proceedings free from unreasonable delay;
  8. to be treated with fairness and with respect for the victim’s dignity and privacy;
  9. to be informed in a timely manner of any plea bargain or deferred prosecution agreement; and
  10. to be informed of the rights under this section and the services described in section 503(c) of the Victims’ Rights and Restitution Act of 1990 (34 U.S.C. § 10607(c)), and provided contact information for the Office of Victims’ Rights.

Patrick Dai is currently in the custody of the U.S. Marshals Service and will continue to be detained pending trial, or on further order of the court.

If you feel that you have been harmed by the alleged federal crimes committed by Patrick Dai, you may be entitled to the above rights. The United States Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of New York has a Victim Witness Unit that is available to provide additional information, answer questions, offer support, and connect you with services to help you heal.

Members of the community are welcome to contact U.S. Attorney’s Office Victim Witness Coordinator Ivy Schoff at:

Resources

Updated April 12, 2024