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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
District of New Mexico

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, June 21, 2018

Previously Convicted Sex Offender from Albuquerque Facing New Federal Child Pornography Charges

Prosecution Brought Under Project Safe Childhood

ALBUQUERQUE – Russell Young, 39, of Albuquerque, N.M., a prior sex offender who is serving a term of supervised release from a prior child pornography conviction, is facing new child pornography charges in a criminal complaint filed by the FBI in federal court in Las Cruces, N.M.  Young made his initial appearance in federal court in Las Cruces, N.M., on June 18, 2018, and this morning, a U.S. Magistrate Judge in Las Cruces found probable cause to support the charges in the criminal complaint.  The Magistrate Judge also ordered Young detained pending trial based on findings that he poses a danger to the community.

The FBI arrested Young on June 15, 2018, on a criminal complaint charging him with distribution and possession of child pornography in Dona Ana County, N.M.  According to the criminal complaint, on Oct. 13, 2011, Young was convicted of receiving child pornography, and was sentenced to 77 months of imprisonment followed by ten years of supervised release.  The complaint alleges that Young violated the terms of his supervised release in March 2017, Oct. 2017, and Nov. 2017, by unlawfully possessing cellular smartphones with internet access.  The cellular smartphone seized from Young in Nov. 2017, allegedly contained multiple images of child pornography. 

If convicted on the distribution charge, Young faces an enhanced penalty of a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment of 15 years and a maximum of 40 years instead of the otherwise applicable five to 20 years because of his prior child pornography conviction.  If convicted on the possession charge, Young faces an enhanced penalty of a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment of ten years and a maximum of 20 years instead of the otherwise applicable ten year maximum penalty because of his prior child pornography conviction.  Charges in criminal complaints are merely accusations and criminal defendants are presumed innocent unless found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

This case was investigated by the Las Cruces office of the FBI.  Assistant U.S. Attorney Alexander B. Shapiro of the U.S. Attorney’s Las Cruces Branch office is prosecuting the case as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice (DOJ) to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse.  Led by United States Attorneys’ Offices and DOJ’s Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims.  For more information about Project Safe Childhood, visit http://www.justice.gov/psc/.

The case also is being prosecuted the case as part of a federal anti-violence initiative that targets violent, repeat offenders for federal prosecution.  Under this initiative, the U.S. Attorney’s Office and federal law enforcement agencies work with New Mexico’s District Attorneys and state, local and tribal law enforcement agencies to target violent or repeat offenders primarily based on their prior criminal convictions for federal prosecution offenders with the goal of making communities in New Mexico safer places for people to live and work.

Topic(s): 
Project Safe Childhood
Component(s): 
Updated June 21, 2018