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Violent Crime

Violent Crime Victims

 

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Victims' Rights Under Federal Law

Violent Crime

Financial Fraud Crime

Victim Services

Victim Impact Statement

Restitution

The Impact

All victims and witnesses are emotionally affected by a crime. You have been involved in a critical event. For some people, this experience can cause unusually strong emotional reactions. Others may report almost no reaction. And still others may report a variety of physical, emotional and social responses. These may appear a few hours or a few days after the incident and in some cases, weeks or months later. You may find yourself faced with feelings unlike those you have previously experienced. These feelings may come and go and vary in intensity. Their duration will depend largely on the severity of the critical event and its significance to you. It is important that you realize that these are normal reactions to an abnormal event.

Physical symptoms you may experience:

•Restlessness

•Headaches

•Upset stomach/nausea

•Changes in appetite

•Nightmares/flashbacks

•Sexual problems

•Tenseness

•Tremors/shaking

•Dizziness

•Sleep disturbances

•Fatigue/loss of energy

•Muscle aches

Emotional reactions you may experience:

•Fear/anxiety

•Depression/grief

•Confusion

•Shocked/dazed

•Easily startled

•Feeling numb

•Inability to concentrate or memory lapses

•Avoidance of situations that are reminders of the incident

•Guilt/blaming yourself

•Sadness

•Anger

•Emotional exhaustion/withdrawal from family and friends

•Feeling lost/abandoned

•Moodiness and irritability

•Re-experiencing the incident repeatedly in your mind

•Difficulty in solving problems or making decision/feeling overwhelmed

•Increased concern for personal safety and the safety of family members.

All of these reactions are normal, and may decrease with time. There is no "right" or "wrong" way to react or feel as a victim. Many others who have been victimized feel the same things as you do now. You are not alone and you are not crazy! If you are in need of support or assistance in dealing with your reaction to the crime, please contact the Victim-Witness Program so we may assist you in your recovery.

 

Violent Crimes Compensation Board

If you are a victim of a violent crime, and you suffered physical or psychological injury, you may be eligible for assistance through the Violent Crimes Compensation Board (VCVB). Overcoming the physical injuries and emotional pain of a violent crime takes time - and it is harder to do when you face financial worries as well. The VCCB helps victims with costs related to crime injuries.

Eligibility:

•Victims in Alaska who are injured in a violent crime such as assault, kidnapping, robbery, sexual abuse of a minor, driving under the influence, and threats to do bodily harm are eligible for benefits

•Dependents and family members of a homicide victim are eligible for benefits

•Others who because of their relationship to a victim incur certain losses

Disqualifiers: 

•Injury occurred while participating in a crime

•Injury occurred while confined in jail, prison, or institutionalized

•The injured person incited, provoked, or consented to the crime.

•The injured person is unwilling to provide reasonable cooperation to law enforcement.

Available benefits:

•Payment of medical, dental and mental health counseling bills

•Partial payment of lost wages

•Partial payment of funeral costs

•Modification to homes for safety reasons

•Relocation expenses

•Counseling for family members of sexual assault victims and homicide victims.

•Property losses are NOT covered

For further information or to apply, contact VCCB directly at 907-465-2379 or visit the website at http://doa.alaska.gov/vccb/home.html.  You can also contact the U.S. Attorney's Office Victim-Witness Program for assistance.

 

Does the U.S. Attorney's Office offer any services to assist victims?

Yes, there are many services provided by our office to assist you if you are a victim of a crime

Updated March 12, 2019

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