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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Eastern District of Texas

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, August 23, 2021

Dallas County Man Sentenced for Attempting to Meet Minor for Sex

PLANO, Texas – An Irving man has been sentenced to federal prison for child exploitation violations in the Eastern District of Texas, announced Acting U.S. Attorney Nicholas J. Ganjei today.

Cody Ryan Turner was convicted by a jury on March 10, 2021, of attempted coercion and enticement of a minor and was sentenced to 120 months in federal prison today by U.S. District Judge Sean D. Jordan.  

“This case is a sober reminder that there are those out there lurking in cyberspace who target children to engage in sexually explicit chat conversations, seeking to eventually meet and sexually abuse these kids,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Nicholas J. Ganjei.  “Parents and teens need to approach online ‘friends’ critically and with caution.  The enticement of minors is not just something we see on television.”

“Thank you to our partners at the Plano Police Department for helping us stop an individual who attempted to entice a child. This case reminds all of us to remain vigilant about our children’s online behavior and social media presence,” said FBI Dallas Special Agent in Charge Matthew DeSarno. “We encourage parents to speak with their children about the dangers of online predators who use popular apps, games, and websites and to report any suspicious activity to law enforcement.”

According to information presented in court, in August 2019, Turner began messaging an individual he believed to be a young teen on a popular social media application.  After receiving no response throughout August 2019, he sent a graphic image to the child in December 2019 then messaged the child again in June 2020, asking if she was interested in a sugar daddy-sugar baby relationship.  At that point, the individual Turner believed to be a teen responded, and identified herself as a child.  Between June 2020 and Sep. 8, 2020, Turner sent a series of sexually explicit messages to this individual, asking about the child’s body and development, discussing the child’s parents and ways to circumvent their supervision of the child’s online activities, and meeting for sex. 

On Sep. 8, 2020, believing that the child was attending school online because of COVID, Turner messaged asking “want company”?  After stating his intention to drive to the child’s residence, Turner asked for verification of the child’s identity, noting “you are very young so there is big risk for me.”  Evidence introduced at trial showed that Turner drove from Irving to a location in Plano to meet the child, at which time he was arrested by a joint team of FBI and the Plano Police Department. 

Turner admitted to texting with the teen but claimed that he believed the person to be “fake” and had driven to the meet site to call “Gotcha!” on the individual.  Turner further stated that he could not explain his actions.

This case is part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse.  Led by U.S. Attorneys’ Offices and the Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS), Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims.  For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

This case was investigated by the Plano Police Department and the Federal Bureau of Investigation and prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Marisa Miller.

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Topic(s): 
Project Safe Childhood
Updated August 23, 2021