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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Western District of Kentucky

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, December 19, 2014

Former University Of Louisville Executive Pleads Guilty To Tax Fraud And Embezzling Funds Tied To UofL Medical Groups

- Diverted $2.8 million for his personal use

- Failed to report $2,470,735 to Internal Revenue Service

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – A former University of Louisville accountant, promoted to Executive Director of the Department of Family & Geriatric Medicine at the University of Louisville School of Medicine (DFGM) pleaded guilty today, in U.S. District Court, to a seven-count federal indictment including charges of theft and bribery in programs that receive federal funds, money laundering, mail fraud, and filing false federal income tax returns, announced Acting U.S. Attorney John E. Kuhn, Jr.

As part of the nearly six year scheme, Perry Chadwick Vaughn, 36, of Sellersburg, Indiana, admitted to diverting contractual checks and patient payments to the University Family and Geriatric Medicine Associates account then withdrew $2,809,489 for his personal use and benefit.

In court, Vaughn admitted to the following - from January 2007 through August 2013 he defrauded the Department of Family and Geriatric Medicine at the University of Louisville School of Medicine (DFGM-UofL) and its affiliated private physician practice groups (collectively “DFGM-Practice Groups”).   While working as the executive director for DFGM-UofL and the business manager form DFGM-Practice Groups Vaughn stole approximately $2,810,201.53 through the use of the United States mail.  Vaughn fraudulently stole contractual checks issued to DFGM-UofL totaling $666,810.11.   Vaughn also stole $604,025.57 in patients payments to DFGM-UofL.  In addition Vaughn directly stole another $1,538,654.24 directly from DFGM-Practice Groups’ accounts.  During the scheme Vaughn caused T.J. Samson Community Hospital to mail a check for $37,750 that he ultimately stole.  In addition, Vaughn submitted $711 in fraudulent travel expenses during the course of the scheme.

During the course of the scheme to defraud both DFGM-UofL and DFGM-Practice Groups Vaughn concealed his theft through a number of means including the following:  he created false bank reconciliations to hide the issuance of checks to himself and he created false bank statements to hide the issuance of checks to himself.  In all instances, the financial transactions were conducted with Republic Bank and Chase Bank,  federally insured financial intuitions.

On February 19, 2009, Vaughn knowingly filed a false U.S. Individual Tax return for calendar year 2008 in that it failed to report $377,492 in total income.  On January 31, 2010, Vaughn knowingly filed a false U.S. Individual Tax return for calendar year 2009 in that it failed to report $610,470 in total income.  On February 22, 2011, Vaughn knowingly filed a false U.S. Individual Tax return for calendar year 2010 in that it failed to report $160,121 in total income.  On January 23, 2012, Vaughn knowingly filed a false U.S. Individual Tax return for calendar year 2011 in that it failed to report $546,022 in total income.  On March 21, 2013, Vaughn knowingly filed a false U.S. Individual Tax return for calendar year 2012 in that it failed to report $776,660 in total income.  Each of the returns was verified by a written declaration that it was made under the penalty of perjury and Vaughn knew in each instance that he was omitting reportable taxable income.

In addition, on September 3, 2013, U.S. District Judge John G. Heyburn II granted the United States’ motion for Temporary Restraining Order enjoining and prohibiting Vaughn, (including family members, financial institutions, and other entities having possession or control of Vaughn's assets), from transferring, selling, dissipating, concealing, or otherwise disposing of, in any manner, his assets in real or personal property, owned, gained or acquired by him or on behalf of his ex-wife.

If convicted at trial, Vaughn faced up to 55 years in prison, a 16 year period of supervised release, and a fine of $1,250,000.

This case is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Bryan Calhoun and is being investigated by the University of Louisville Police Department, the United States Secret Service, the Internal Revenue Service, Criminal Investigations, and the United States Postal Inspection Service.

Updated December 19, 2014