New Leadership, New Office for Antitrust Division Criminal Program

New Leadership, New Office for Antitrust Division Criminal Program

Division Update Spring 2014

2013 ushered in significant changes for the Division’s criminal program, including new leadership at both the Deputy Assistant Attorney General and office management levels, and a new criminal enforcement office in Washington, D.C.

Deputy Assistant Attorney General Brent Snyder

Brent Snyder

Brent Snyder

In November 2013, Brent Snyder took over as Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Criminal Enforcement. Snyder is a Division veteran; he served as an attorney in the National Criminal Enforcement Section from December 2003 until August 2011, when he joined the Division’s San Francisco Office. Snyder played a key role in some of the Division’s most important recent investigations and trials. He was co-lead in U.S. v. AU Optronics Corporation, which resulted in multiple corporate and individual convictions and a $500 million corporate fine; U.S. v. Leung, in which another AU Optronics executive was convicted after a three-week trial; and U.S. v. Frank Peake, which resulted in the conviction of a high-level executive in the coastal water freight industry.

Snyder twice received the Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished Service as well as an Antitrust Division Award of Distinction. In 2013, California Lawyer magazine named him a California attorney of the year. Before joining the Division, Snyder was a partner at Perkins Coie LLP.

New Regional Office Leadership

Over the past year, the Division has also welcomed new leadership in its Chicago, New York, and San Francisco offices.

Frank Vondrak

Frank Vondrak

In Chicago, former Assistant Chief Frank Vondrak became Chief and Kalina Tulley became Assistant Chief. Vondrak joined the Division’s Chicago Office in 1989 and served as the office’s Assistant Chief from February 2000 until his appointment as Chief in June 2013. During his years at the Division, Vondrak led a number of successful investigations and prosecutions, including the Indianapolis ready-mixed concrete case, which resulted in a criminal fine of more than $29 million—the largest criminal fine in a domestic price-fixing case to date. Vondrak has received many awards during his tenure, including the Antitrust Division Award of Distinction in 2006, the Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished Service in 2007, the Council of Inspectors General Award for Excellence in 2009, and numerous outstanding performance and special achievement awards.

Kalina Tulley

Kalina Tulley

Kalina Tulley became Assistant Chief of the Chicago Office in August 2013. She joined the Division in 2001 as a trial attorney in the Chicago Office, where she investigated and prosecuted numerous antitrust and fraud violations in multiple industries and jurisdictions throughout the United States. Among other achievements, Tulley served as lead attorney in the U.S. v. Ghavami investigation and five-week trial, which resulted in the conviction of three former UBS executives. Before joining the Division, she worked as an associate at Freeman, Freeman & Salzman P.C. and as an Assistant Illinois State’s Attorney, Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, including as the Supervisor of the Criminal Appeals Division and in the Felony Trial Division, Sex Crimes & Homicides Unit, Felony Review Unit, and Juvenile Justice Bureau. In 2012, Tulley received an Assistant Attorney General Award.

Jeff Martino

Jeff Martino

In January 2014, Jeff Martino became Chief of the New York Office. He rejoins the Division after serving for three years in the U.S. Attorney’s Office, District of Arizona. While there, Martino served first as an Assistant U.S. Attorney, during which time he conducted eight jury trials and numerous pretrial hearings in complex matters. He then was appointed Chief of the office’s Financial Crime and Public Integrity Section, where he supervised the investigation and/or prosecution of more than 200 individuals and corporations. Martino started his career in the Antitrust Division’s New York Office in 2002 where he helped prosecute more than 50 individual and corporate defendants, including in U.S. v. Yaron et al.; U.S. v. McDonald et al.; and U.S. v. General Linen et al. In 2011, Martino received an Assistant Attorney General Award.

Marc Siegel

Marc Siegel

In the San Francisco Office, Marc Siegel took over as Chief at the beginning of 2014. Siegel has been with the Division since 1986 and served as a trial attorney in the San Francisco Office until 2002. During that time, he led major international cartel investigations, including sorbates, monochloroacetic acid, and organic peroxides. From 2003 to 2004, he served as the Assistant Chief of the San Francisco Office. In 2005, Siegel joined the Division’s front office in Washington, D.C. as the Director of Criminal Enforcement, a position he held until 2010, when he was appointed Chief Counsel to the Assistant Attorney General for Criminal Litigation. In that capacity, he oversaw the municipal bonds investigation and prosecutions. In 2013, Siegel was Acting Chief of the New York Office. He was awarded an Assistant Attorney General Award in 1998, 2002, 2009, and 2012.

New Criminal Enforcement Office in Washington, D.C.

Earlier this year the Division created a new criminal enforcement office in Washington, D.C. to address its heavy criminal workload. Initially the office—Washington Criminal II (the National Criminal Enforcement Section in Washington, D.C. was renamed Washington Criminal I)—will focus on real estate auction bid rigging matters that the Atlanta Office handled previously. Over time, the office’s portfolio will broaden to include other criminal matters. The Division expects the office to employ 10 to 15 lawyers and to grow as its workload expands.

Mary Strimel

Mary Strimel

The new office’s managers—Chief Mary Strimel and Assistant Chief Ann O’Brien—come from the Division’s experienced career ranks. Before becoming Chief, Mary Strimel was a trial attorney with the Division, splitting her time between the Networks and Technology Section and the National Criminal Enforcement Section. She joined the Division in 2004 and has contributed to a variety of Division litigation and enforcement efforts, including playing a lead role in U.S. v. Anheuser-Busch INBev, a merger case that resulted in significant divestitures, and U.S. v. Nix, a criminal case that settled on the eve of trial; presenting the Division’s efficiencies case at trial in U.S. v. H&R Block Inc. et al; and leading the Europe-related phase of the Division’s international freight-forwarder criminal cases, which resulted in six corporate pleas with multimillion dollar fines. Strimel was awarded an Assistant Attorney General Award in 2011. Prior to joining the Division, she was a partner at Cohen, Milstein, Hausfeld and Toll PLLC.

Ann O'Brien

Ann O’Brien

Assistant Chief Ann O’Brien joins the office after serving as Counsel to the Assistant Attorney General since January 2011, where she advised the Assistant Attorney General, Division leadership, and staff prosecutors on every aspect of the Division’s criminal program, including investigation, case management, trial strategy, and policy matters. Previously, she was Senior Counsel to the Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Criminal Enforcement. From October 2011 to January 2013, O’Brien was a Special Assistant U.S. Attorney in the District of Maryland prosecuting a wide variety of federal crimes, including white collar, firearms, and narcotics cases. She was a Special Assistant to the Directors of Enforcement from June 2002 to June 2004, and began her career as a trial attorney in the Division’s Cleveland Office in September 2000. In 2012, O’Brien was awarded the U.S. General Service Administration’s Office of Inspector General Special Recognition Award. She received the Division’s Special Achievement Award for a Special Act or Service in 2009 and an Assistant Attorney General Award in 2006.

Contacts

See our Contact Information page to contact certain offices or individuals in the Division.

Was this page helpful?

Was this page helpful?
Yes No