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Meet the U.S. Attorney

Acting U.S. Attorney William D. Weinreb addresses the media

William D. Weinreb is the Acting U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts. He assumed that position on January 14, 2017.

Weinreb joined the U.S. Attorney’s Office in 2000 and previously served as a trial attorney, supervisor, and member of the Office’s leadership team. He was the lead prosecutor in the trial of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who was convicted and sentenced to death for his role in bombing the Boston Marathon and executing an MIT police officer. He also successfully prosecuted a Boston man who helped fund the attempted car bombing of Times Square; Massachusetts’s first case of foreign economic espionage; its first case involving use of a laser to interfere with the operation of an aircraft; and its first case involving the threatened use of a biological weapon. Earlier in his career he prosecuted numerous other violent crime and white collar cases, including narcotics trafficking, money laundering, public corruption, insurance fraud, and health care fraud.

Throughout his career as a prosecutor, Weinreb has worked tirelessly to establish strong relationships between the U.S. Attorney’s Office and federal, state, and local law enforcement leaders; members of the judiciary; and Massachusetts community organizations. He has been a leader in the Office’s outreach efforts to vulnerable communities. He also helped launch the office’s new Civil Rights Unit and has been a strong advocate for the protection of civil rights and civil liberties in the Commonwealth.

Weinreb has received many awards for this professional work, including the Attorney General’s Award for Exceptional Service, the Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished Service, the FBI Director’s Award, and the DOJ Justice for Victims of Crime Award.

Weinreb is a graduate of Wesleyan University and Harvard Law School, where he served as Treasurer of the Harvard Law Review. Before joining the Department of Justice, Weinreb clerked for then-Chief Judge Stephen Breyer of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit and spent four years as a civil litigator.

Updated April 7, 2017