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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Western District of Virginia

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, September 25, 2014

Four Arrested On Federal Drug Charges

Suspects Were Apprehended As Part Of A Multi-Jurisdiction HIDTA Operation

ROANOKE, VIRGINIA – On Wednesday, September 24, 2014, the Roanoke High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) group, which consists of officers from the City of Roanoke, Roanoke County, City of Salem, Town of Vinton, Virginia State Police and the Drug Enforcement Administration Roanoke Resident Office, served a series of search and arrest warrants in relation to a long-term heroin trafficking investigation. These warrants were executed throughout the area and resulted in multiple arrests.

As a result of yesterday’s HIDTA operation, four people have been arrested and charged via federal criminal complaints. Those charged include:

Vaughn Dixon Baylor, Jr., 46, of Roanoke, has been charged with one count of distributing heroin.

Stephon Clifford Bryant, 35, of Roanoke, has been charged with two counts of distributing heroin.

Anthony Curtis Barnes, 42, of Salem, has been charged with one count of distributing cocaine and one count of possessing with the intent to distribute heroin.

Jamaal Eugene Barber, 33, of Roanoke, has been charged with one count of distributing heroin.

The investigation is part of the Roanoke HIDTA Group’s continued focus on combating the rising presence of heroin in and around the Roanoke Valley. The investigation of the case was conducted by the members of the Roanoke High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) group, which consists of officers from the City of Roanoke, Roanoke County, City of Salem, Town of Vinton, Virginia State Police and the Drug Enforcement Administration Roanoke Resident Office. Assistant United States Attorney Ashley B. Neese will prosecute the case for the United States.

A criminal complaint is only a charge and not evidence of guilt. The defendants are entitled to a fair trial with the burden on the government to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

Updated April 14, 2015