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Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Western District of Virginia

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, April 22, 2016

Pair Sentenced For Making False Statements in Regards to Healthcare Programs

Cassie Davis, Kevin Freeman Submitted False Timesheets, Lied About Services Provided

HARRISONBURG, VIRGINIA – A pair of Winchester residents, who previously pled guilty to submitting false timesheets for payment to Virginia Medicaid, were sentenced yesterday in the United States District Court for the Western District of Virginia in Harrisonburg, United States Attorney John P. Fishwick Jr. and Virginia Attorney General Mark R. Herring announced today.

Kevin Lavelt Freeman, 51, and Cassie Lee Davis, 48, both of Winchester, Virginia, previously pled guilty to federal charges related to making false statements as they relate to a healthcare program.

Freeman previously pled guilty to one count of making false statements in connection with a healthcare program and one count of making false statements in connection to a healthcare benefits program. Yesterday in District Court, he was sentenced to 18 months of federal incarceration and two years of supervised release thereafter. In addition, Freeman was also ordered to pay $28,176 in restitution to the Department of Medical Assistance Services.  

Davis previously pled guilty to one count of making false statements related to a healthcare matter and one count of healthcare fraud. Yesterday in District Court, she was sentenced to time served, five days, and ordered to pay restitution in the amount of $28,176 to the Department of Medical Assistance Services.  

“We are proud to work alongside the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit of the Virginia Attorney General’s Office on these very important prosecutions,” United States Attorney John P. Fishwick Jr. said today. “Protecting the integrity of important social programs such as Medicaid and Medicare is of the utmost importance to law enforcement.”

“The great relationship between our Medicaid Fraud Control Unit, the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the Department of Medical Assistance Services, and our law enforcement partners is critical to holding providers accountable for fraud that weakens important healthcare programs and does a real disservice to the vulnerable patients who rely on them,” said Virginia Attorney General Mark R. Herring.

According to evidence presented at previous hearings by Assistant United States Attorney Grayson Hoffman and Assistant Attorney General and Special Assistant United States Attorney Vaso Doubles, Davis and Freeman, from July 2012 to August 2012, conspired to defraud the special caregiver program covered under Virginia Medicaid. During this time period Freeman was incarcerated. Davis, however, submitted, on at least two occasions, timesheets for payment to the Virginia Medicaid program for services that were never rendered by Freeman. In addition, Davis also falsified bills by making materially false statements or representations about the services Freeman provided her during the time he was incarcerated.

Davis and Freeman communicated by telephone about their fraud during Freeman’s incarceration. These telephone calls were recorded and a number of the calls included discussions between Davis and Freeman regarding the manner in which they were defrauding the Virginia Medicaid Program.

The investigation of the case was conducted by the Virginia Office of the Attorney General’s Medicaid Fraud Control Unit, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the United States Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General.  Assistant United States Attorney Grayson Hoffman and Assistant Attorney General and Special Assistant United States Attorney Vaso Doubles prosecuted the case for the United States.

Topic: 
Healthcare Fraud
Updated April 22, 2016