Notice

Department of Justice

Executive Office for Immigration Review


Friday, June 19, 2015

EOIR’s Board of Immigration Appeals Launches
Pilot Program to Solicit Amicus Curiae Briefs

FALLS CHURCH, VA – The Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) today announced that its appellate component, the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA), has launched a one-year pilot program to solicit amicus curiae, or "friend of the court," briefs from interested parties in an effort to reach a broader range of the knowledgeable public and, through their contributions, gain greater perspective on more nuanced topics.

During the pilot, the BIA will request input by posting amicus invitations, which will provide a description of the legal issue(s) the BIA wishes interested individuals to address. The invitation will also include instructions on how to enter an appearance as an amicus and how to file an amicus brief.

To sign up for the BIA Amicus listserv, please visit the "Engage with EOIR" page at http://www.justice.gov/eoir/engage-with-eoir. Current and archived invitations also will be available through that link.

- EOIR -

The Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) is an agency within the Department of Justice. Under delegated authority from the Attorney General, immigration judges and the Board of Immigration Appeals interpret and adjudicate immigration cases according to United States immigration laws. EOIR's immigration judges conduct administrative court proceedings in immigration courts located throughout the nation. They determine whether foreign-born individuals—whom the Department of Homeland Security charges with violating immigration law—should be ordered removed from the United States or should be granted relief from removal and be permitted to remain in this country. The Board of Immigration Appeals primarily reviews appeals of decisions by immigration judges. EOIR's Office of the Chief Administrative Hearing Officer adjudicates immigration-related employment cases. EOIR is committed to ensuring fairness in all of the cases it adjudicates.


Executive Office for Immigration Review

Updated June 19, 2015

Was this page helpful?

Was this page helpful?
Yes No