You are here

Justice News

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
District of Arizona

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Justice Department Awards $8.4 Million to Support Native American Crime Victims in Ten States-Arizona Receives over $1.5 Million

     PHOENIX – This week, the Office of Justice Programs’ Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) awarded more than $8.4 million to support crime victims in Native American communities in 10 states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Idaho, Michigan, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah and Washington. The group of 17 awards is the fifth in a series of grants being made by OVC to American Indian and Alaska Native communities. OVC has now awarded more than $34 million of nearly $100 million to support tribal victim service programs.

     The awards - 63 in total so far - will fund critical crime victim services, such as counseling, transitional housing, emergency services and transportation. The grants are supported by the Crime Victims Fund, a repository of federal criminal fines, fees and special assessments. The fund includes zero tax dollars. 

     “American Indian and Alaska Native communities face extensive public safety challenges, but through creative approaches that combine traditional methods with innovative solutions, they are demonstrating their determination to meet the needs of victims in their communities,” said OJP’s Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Matt M. Dummermuth. “These grants, part of historic levels of funding awarded by the Department of Justice to American Indian and Alaska Native communities, will provide significant resources to bring critical services to those who suffer the effects of crime and violence.”

     “We congratulate Pascua Yaqui Tribe, Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community, and San Carlos Apache Tribe on being selected for these awards from DOJ’s Office for Victims of Crime,” stated Elizabeth A. Strange, First Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Arizona.  “The $1.5 million in OVC funding will help these communities to expand their services for crime victims and help to prevent victims from suffering further harm.”  

     According to OJP’s Bureau of Justice Statistics, American Indians and Alaska Natives experience violent crime at rates far greater than the general population.

     The following tribes (or tribal organizations) are the 17 receiving grant awards this week. More than 150 tribes are expected to receive funding this spring to help their communities support crime victims over the next three years:

  • The Pascua Yaqui Tribe (Arizona) received $491,450 to enhance existing services to victims by providing crisis intervention and response, resources, referrals, accompaniment to forensic interviews and hospitals, and court advocacy. Funding will support a victim advocate, staff training, transportation for victims, program and office supplies, and emergency assistance.
     
  • The Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community (Arizona) received $336,031 to enhance its existing victim services program by creating a multi-disciplinary team, which will expand services to victims of violent crimes. Funding will support a victim services liaison, staff training, program and office supplies, staff training and emergency assistance.
     
  • The San Carlos Apache Tribe (Arizona) received $716,117 to expand its existing victim services programs by supporting a victim advocate, case manager, program manager, staff training, transportation for victims, program and office supplies, a consultant to serve as a forensic interviewer, and a consultant to provide training on a trauma-informed approach to victim services.
     
  • The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe (South Dakota) received $315,000 to provide victim services on and around the Flandreau reservation. Funding will expand victim assistance and establish new services for unemployed battered women and their children in remote rural areas on and off the reservation.
     
  • The Akiak Native Community (Alaska) received $450,932 to develop a comprehensive victim services program to assist all victims in the community. Funding will support staff training, program and office supplies, travel to Anchorage for victims to access counseling and other services not available in the community, and emergency assistance.
     
  • The Seneca Cayuga Nation (Oklahoma) received $720,000 to enhance and expand its existing victim services program by funding long-term support and other victim services that are not currently available. Funding will support staff training, program and office supplies, transportation and emergency assistance.
     
  • The Taos Pueblo Administration (New Mexico) received $694,002 to enhance existing victim services and build program capacity, with a focus on victims of elder abuse and domestic violence. Funding will support the establishment of a case management system, a financial counselor to assist elder victims of financial fraud and abuse, and emergency assistance.
     
  • The New Stuyahok Village (Alaska) received $382,750 to conduct a community needs assessment and prepare a strategic plan to develop a victim services program, with a focus on shelters, advocacy, crisis counseling and other services to victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking and other violent crimes. 
     
  • The Coeur d’Alene Tribe (Idaho) received $478,504 to expand victim-centered services through a tribal healing and recovery program. Funding will support staff training, program and office supplies, transportation for victims, outreach and emergency assistance.
     
  • The Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation (California) received $40,000 to enhance local transportation for victims within the tribe’s five-county service area.

 

  • The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians of Washington (Washington) received $381,933 to expand and enhance the existing victim assistance program by increasing services to children and elders who are victims of crime. Funding will support the hiring of a social worker, staff training, program and office supplies, and transportation for victims.
  • The Suquamish Tribe (Washington) received $356,621 to enhance existing services by conducting a needs assessment and developing a comprehensive strategic plan for coordinating and integrating the delivery of services to crime victims. Funding will support travel for victims to access specialized services not available locally, program and office supplies, a forensic interviewer, a strategic planning consultant, and trauma response training for staff.
     
  • The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (Idaho) received $649,244 to address four critical needs in existing programming, including shelter renovations to ensure safety and accessibility, trauma-informed case management, satellite victim service offices and expansion of services to vulnerable adults. Funding will support a case manager, domestic violence shelter and office space, program and office supplies, and emergency assistance.
     
  • The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma (Oklahoma) received $541,872 to expand its existing victim services program by identifying victims in need of additional services and developing resources to meet those needs. Funding will support a senior victim advocate, staff training, program and office supplies, transportation for victims and emergency assistance.
     
  • The Chugachmiut, Inc. (Alaska) received $625,094 to develop the Aprun Aswigmen: Pathway Toward Healing program that will expand and enhance its domestic violence and sexual assault program to serve a broader population of victims. Funding will support a tribal victim services coordinator, forensic medical examination equipment, program and office supplies, and training for staff on serving victims of traumatic brain injury as a result of their victimization.
      
  • The Pokagon Band of Potawtomi Indians (Michigan) received $602,470 to expand its existing victim services program to include services for all victims of crime. Funding will support a project coordinator, adult protective services worker, staff training, outreach materials, legal assistance to victims, staff to conduct a needs assessment and develop a strategic plan, and emergency assistance.
     
  • The Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah (Utah) received $699,000 to expand its existing victim services program by creating a crime victim services program that is more accessible to tribal members. Funding will support a family services manager; staff training; transport for victims; program and office supplies; and subcontracts with the Family Support Center of Southwestern Utah, Family Support Center of Washington County, Canyon Creek Services, Dove Center and New Horizons. The grant will provide shelter and advocacy services for adult and child victims, and subcontracts with the Iron County Children’s Justice Center and Washington County Children’s Justice Center to provide forensic interviews and exams for child victims.
     

     “American Indian and Alaska Native crime victims continue to face challenges in accessing vital services and resources needed to help survivors address their trauma and navigate a complex system,” said OVC Director Darlene Hutchinson. “The Justice Department has made it a priority to partner with tribes to help victims and their families rebuild their lives in the aftermath of violence.”           

     The Office of Justice Programs, directed by Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Matt M. Dummermuth, provides federal leadership, grants and resources to improve the nation’s capacity to prevent and reduce crime, assist victims and enhance the rule of law by strengthening the criminal justice system. More information about OJP and its components can be found at www.ojp.gov.

 

###

 

 

 

RELEASE NUMBER:           2019­-051_Crime Victim Grants

 

# # #

For more information on the U.S. Attorney’s Office, District of Arizona, visit http://www.justice.gov/usao/az/

Follow the U.S. Attorney’s Office, District of Arizona, on Twitter @USAO_AZ for the latest news.

 

 

 

Topic(s): 
Community Outreach
Component(s): 
Press Release Number: 
2019¬-051_Crime Victim Grants
Updated April 17, 2019